Rutgers turfgrasses prized at Baltusrol, PGA event site

When the world’s top male golfers gather at the legendary Baltusrol Golf Club this week, they will be playing on numerous turfgrasses developed by Rutgers University.

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Rutgers Equine Science Center kicks off 15 years of excellence

Close to 100 people attended the 2016 Rutgers Equine Science Center summer showcase in the kickoff celebration of the center’s 15-year anniversary… Welcoming remarks were given by Dr. Karyn Malinowski, director of the Equine Science Center, Dr. Wendie Cohick, chair of the Department of Animal Sciences, and Dr. Brad Hillman, senior associate director of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station and director of research. The event continued with the presentation of a Congressional Certificate from U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross (D-1) by Sharon Ortepio, chair of the Equine Advisory Board, a part of the New Jersey Department of Agriculture. The center was honored with a ceremonial proclamation from the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders, sponsored by Lillian Burry.

Read the entire article at Greater Media Newspapers »

Rutgers Turfgrasses Prized at Baltusrol Golf Club, Host of 98th PGA Championship

When the world’s top male golfers gather at the legendary Baltusrol Golf Club this week, they will be playing on numerous turfgrasses developed by Rutgers University… Rutgers has a decades-long record of breeding and cultivating top-performing turfgrasses, according to Bruce B. Clarke, extension specialist in turfgrass pathology and director of Rutgers’ Center for Turfgrass Science, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary… To date, Rutgers has developed more than 400 varieties of turfgrasses and licensed them to more than 20 companies, according William A. Meyer, professor and director of turfgrass breeding at Rutgers… "Anywhere cool-season grasses are being grown in a sports stadium, there’s a very good possibility that it’s a Rutgers grass, maybe not the entire stadium, but part of it," said James A. Murphy, Rutgers’ extension specialist in turfgrass management. "It’s sold all over the world."

Read the entire article at Tap Into »

New peach and nectarine varieties help Eastern growers compete

Peach growers and shippers in the Northeast who market to large retailers are seeing increasing competition from shippers in California, Georgia, South Carolina and even countries in the Southern Hemisphere… Traditionally, the market has hung its hat on yellow-fleshed peaches, said Jerry Frecon, a Rutgers University emeritus professor  ‘said there are plenty of new peaches and nectarines being developed. Many in the Mid-Atlantic states are coming from Rutgers University’s Tree Fruit Breeding Program, under the direction of plant biology and pathology professor Joseph Goffreda, at Cream Ridge, New Jersey.

Read the entire article at Good Fruit Grower »

Rutgers Equine Center Kicks Off “15 Years Of Excellence”

Summer Showcase #12 Group Shot

Presentation of the New Jersey Joint Legislative Resolution by Ann Dorsett to the Rutgers University Equine Science Center. Left to right: Ann Dorsett, Liz Durkin, Sharon Ortepio, Karyn Malinowski, Carey Williams, Brad Hillman, and Wendie Cohick.

The 2016 Rutgers Equine Science Center Summer Showcase was a huge success! Close to 100 people participated in the kickoff celebration of the Center’s 15-year anniversary on July 13th. Welcoming remarks were given by Karyn Malinowski, director of the Equine Science Center, and Wendie Cohick, chair of the Department of Animal Sciences, and Brad Hillman, senior associate director of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station and director of Research.

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Program for Somerset County students harvests salads, and learning

This spring, the Seeds to Salads program run by the Rutgers Master Gardeners of Somerset County reaped in giant salads which fed more than 300 children, teachers, and Master Gardener volunteers. Volunteers in the program worked with third-graders at Whiton Elementary School in Branchburg, and with second-, third- and fourth-graders at Pine Grove Manor Elementary School in Franklin Township.

Read the entire article at My Central Jersey »

Rutgers Equine Science Center kicks off “15 Years of Excellence” Celebration

The 2016 Rutgers Equine Science Center Summer Showcase was deemed a huge success by organizers. Close to 100 people participated in the kickoff celebration of the Center’s 15-year anniversary… Welcoming remarks were given by Dr. Karyn Malinowski, Director of the Equine Science Center… The event continued with the presentation of a Congressional Certificate from U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross (NJ-01), and presented by Ms. Sharon Ortepio, Chair of the Equine Advisory Board, a part of the New Jersey Department of Agriculture.

Read the entire article at NJ.com »

Strange contests abound at this year’s Warren County Farmers’ Fair

Summer is filled with fairs and festivals, each boasting competitions, carnival rides and famous fair food. But organizers of the Warren County Farmers’ Fair and Hot Air Balloon Festival hope its unique events combined with classic fair favorites will distinguish it… This year, the fair is putting an emphasis on safe canning practices thanks to the rise of recent trends in buying local produce and growing at home. Home canning is a way to help preserve food as well as create new dishes with fresh produce. The fair’s canning competition is encouraging fairgoers to try canning and, with the help of the Department of Family & Community Health Sciences of Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Warren County, do so safely.

Read the entire article at Lehigh Valley Live »

Precision Aerial Mosquito Control Made Possible by Rutgers’ ‘Skeetercopters’

Drone spraying salt marsh.

Unmanned aerial system (UAS) spraying a salt marsh in New Jersey.

In 1930, Rutgers University made the world’s first aerial application for mosquito control. These early experiments were ridiculed as ‘pie-in-the-sky’, but by 1947, a million acres of mosquito habitat were being treated annually by air. Today we stand at the edge of another technological revolution with transformational promise for mosquito control: unmanned aerial systems (UAS), that is, robotic aircraft or ‘drones’ controlled by computers. As we are increasingly challenged to diminish pesticide use for mosquito control, UAS offer potential for precision mosquito control. Local mosquito control agencies will use this emerging technology to target narrowly-defined areas, applying insecticides precisely where needed, thereby reducing time, money and environmental impact.

Rutgers has constructed several experimental drones for mosquito control, including a heavy-lift hexacopter built on a carbon-fiber airframe for less than $5,000. The aircraft are lifted and propelled by multiple electric motors and are virtually maintenance free. These ‘skeetercopters’ are equipped with an array of equipment, including sonar, barometer, magnetometer, gyros, camera, accelerometers, GPS, telemetry and more. A mission planner permits setting point-and-click GPS waypoints so missions are executed entirely autonomously including takeoff and ‘return to launch’ landing.

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Tough season forces N.J. Peach Festival to be canceled

Peach ice cream – fresh-dipped and fabulous – will be featured at the 2016 Gloucester County 4-H Fair this year. But there won’t be a Peach Bake-Off, or a Little Miss Peach competition. And a 2016 Peach Queen will not be crowned, either… This spring’s weather hit local growers hard. An unusually warm spell in late March – which encouraged early varieties of peaches to blossom – was followed by a deep freeze the night of April 4 and into the morning of April 5. "The temperatures ranged from 17 to 25 degrees," notes Hemant Gohil, agricultural agent at the Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Gloucester County.

Read the entire article at The Philadelphia Inquirer »