Rutgers SEBS First Year Student Induction Ceremony 2014 Video

Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS) held its second annual induction ceremony for incoming freshmen and transfer students for the 2014-2015 academic year on Labor Day, Sept. 1, at the Nicholas Music Center on the Douglass Campus. This new annual tradition welcomes SEBS students with a ceremony that introduces them to the rich history and traditions of the school as well as the many resources and activities available to them throughout the school year. Watch as faculty and students share their thoughts on the event.

Video: Rutgers SEBS First Year Student Induction Ceremony 2014

Alumni Story: Mark Robson, Making Rutgers His Home

Editor’s Note: In celebration of the 150th anniversary of our designation as the land grant institution in New Jersey, alumni are invited to tell their own Rutgers “story.” Mark Gregory Robson holds four Rutgers degrees – a B.S. (1977) in Agricultural Science from Cook College, a master’s (1979) and Ph.D. (1988) in Plant Science from the Graduate School-New Brunswick, and an M.P.H. (1995) in Environmental and Occupational Health from the School of Public Health. Here is his story, in his own words.

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Mark visits with farmers in rural Vietnam to discuss rice production and pesticide exposure.

I like to joke that my mother dropped me off in 1973, and I am still waiting for her to come back. Actually, it was my Aunt Leah and Uncle Frank who dropped me off, and I am still here – 42 years, four degrees, three jobs, and one wife later.

My first exposure to Rutgers came as a kid at home on the farm. Robson’s Farm was a typical small family farm with 35 dairy cows, 3,000 laying hens and about 140 acres of vegetables and field crops. Our county agents were regular visitors to our farm. My brother, sister, and I all became members of the Meadow Clippers 4-H Dairy Club. Through 4-H, I started going to functions on the Cook Campus, State 4-H camp and other parts of Rutgers. All of this exposed me to the Rutgers College of Agriculture and Environmental Science (CAES).

I applied to Rutgers in 1972 and came as a freshman in 1973 at the newly formed Cook College. I ended up living on campus in Helyar House, due to the influence of my neighbors, the Hlubiks. All six Hlubik brothers went to Rutgers, and all were part of the Cooperative Living Group, Helyar House or its predecessors: Patrick, Michael, Gerard, Raymond, Joseph, and William. Joe was my classmate, Joe went to Michigan for his Ph.D. and then went to Penn State as a faculty member. Later Joe became a Catholic priest and is now the pastor of St. Andrew’s parish near my home. Bill, the youngest brother, is the Rutgers Cooperative Extension Middlesex County Agriculture and Resource Management Agent. [Read more...]

SEBS Second Annual Induction Ceremony Welcomes Class of 2018

The School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS) held its second annual induction ceremony for incoming freshmen and transfer students for the 2014-2015 academic year on Labor Day, Sept. 1, at the Nicholas Music Center on the Douglass Campus. This new annual tradition welcomes SEBS students with a ceremony that introduces them to the rich history and traditions of the school as well as the many resources and activities available to them throughout the school year. Speakers included student representatives from clubs and the SEBS Governing Council, as well as members of the faculty and administration of the school.

2014 SEBS New Student Induction

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New students were greeted at the registration table where they received a SEBS T-shirt, a name tag and an acorn from the oak trees on Red Oak Lane. Upon graduation, students will be given an oak sapling. Photo: Matt Rainey

Rutgers Food Innovation Center Wins Award from U.S. Small Business Administration

The Rutgers Food Innovation Center (FIC), a food business incubation and economic development program of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, has been recognized by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) as a winner of its first Growth Accelerator Fund competition.

Natale Grande and The Flying Meatball team inspecting, sorting and packaging gourmet meatballs. Photo credit: The Flying Meatball Company.

Natale Grande and The Flying Meatball team inspecting, sorting and packaging gourmet meatballs at FIC in Bridgeton. Photo credit: The Flying Meatball Company.

The FIC is the only recipient from New Jersey to earn this award and will receive a cash prize of $50,000 to create the infrastructure for developing this new accelerator program. The winners will be honored in Washington, D.C., by the SBA, in partnership with the Global Accelerator Network, at a Fly-In Day in November, which is designated National Entrepreneurship Month.

“We are very excited to be selected by the SBA for this award”, said Lou Cooperhouse, director of the Rutgers Food Innovation Center. “We have been recognized globally for our economic development impacts and now we will be able to take our Center to an even higher level – by creating linkages between our clients and the funding community.”

“This award is indicative of the commitment by Rutgers in regional economic development”, said Margaret Brennan-Tonetta, associate vice president of economic development at Rutgers. “The Rutgers Food Innovation Center is a model for university public-private partnerships that generates significant economic impacts for the state. The new Growth Accelerator program that the center will establish with this funding will dramatically increase these impacts and maximize its benefits to the food industry.” [Read more...]

Botanists battle ‘plant blindness’ with seeds of knowledge

Since she began teaching at Rutgers 13 years ago, botany professor Lena Struwe has seen growing student interest in learning about plants. But that desire often comes without the basic plant knowledge that previous generations of students arrived on campus with…"Many times, I have to teach from scratch. ‘This is a petal. This is a leaf. This is a branch,’ " said Struwe, who, like plant-science educators across the country, bemoans what has come to be known as "plant blindness" or plant illiteracy among not just college students, but adults and children, too.

Read the entire article at articles.philly.com »