Alumni Story: Daniel Mascarenhas (SEBS ’13) – Pairing Science and Service

 Dan Mascarenhas is pictured outside the Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland.

Dan Mascarenhas is pictured outside the Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland.

Like many first-year students, Dan Mascarenhas was unsure of his life’s course. In high school, he had volunteered with the Emergency Medical Squad (EMS) in his hometown of Moorestown, New Jersey, as a community service activity and gravitated to “the high intensity and personal dedication required to serve and help patients in need.”

So it seemed only natural that he would set his sights on medicine, especially since his mother is a physician. However, when he arrived on campus, he was reluctant to head in that direction, mainly because he had witnessed firsthand and “appreciated the daily sacrifices that physicians make in not only long hours, but also missed family time.”

Nevertheless, after Dan’s graduation in 2013, he applied to and was accepted into the University of Maryland School of Medicine and expects to receive his M.D. degree in May 2017.

“Coming into college, I was reluctant to pursue medicine but kept my mind open,” he recalled. “I decided on biotechnology as a major because of my interest in science, the field’s promise for employment and success, and the caliber of the program at Rutgers.” [Read more…]

Spiders in N.J.: Entomological Consultant at Rutgers Explains Arachnids

Curious about those eight-legged, eight-eyed wonders quietly living in nooks and crannies of your home or weaving expansive webs outdoors?… The Daily Record met with Eugene Fuzy, entomological consultant for Rutgers University in New Brunswick, to learn more about the spiders most prevalent in New Jersey, the ones considered most dangerous based on their venomous bite, and superstitions and misperceptions about these magical and beneficial creatures… "I’ve been fascinated with spiders since I was three years old. I was asthmatic as a kid and couldn’t have furry pets, so a Colorado potato beetle was my first pet and then I moved on to spiders. As a naturalist, I love spiders because they’re so unique, visually active and create such amazing webs," said Fuzy.

Read the entire article at www.dailyrecord.com »

New City School Names Alexis Wright Next Head of School

Alexis Wright has been unanimously selected by New City School’s Board of Trustees to serve as the next Head of School. Alexis comes to New City School from Bank Street College of Education in New York, NY, where he has served as Dean of Children’s Programs and Head of School since 2009… Alexis has had experience with progressive schools with a focus on experiential learning as well as a more traditional school that implements innovation in the learning process. Prior to Bank Street, Alexis held several positions at Rye Country Day School in New York, including Assistant Head of School, Director of Financial Aid, and Principal of the Middle School. He also served as Principal of the Middle School at The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools… Alexis received his M.A. in Marine Affairs and Policy and a B.S. in Human Ecology from Rutgers University.

Read the entire article at www.interact.com »

Showplace Farms Shutdown Clouds Horse Racing

Showplace Farms, a training center here that houses more than 400 horses, will close on Oct. 1, officials said Tuesday in an announcement that clouded what was supposed to be a celebration this week of New Jersey’s horse-racing industry… Showplace Farms sprawls out over 150 acres in Western Monmouth County. Started 35 years ago, it includes racetracks, paddocks, a therapy swimming pool and a blacksmith and tack shop. Its closing comes as all eyes are on Monmouth Park this weekend, where American Pharoah, racing’s first Triple Crown winner in 37 years, is scheduled to compete in the William Hill Haskell Invitational… The race horse industry in 2009 was estimated to generate $780 million a year and account for 7,000 jobs, according to a Rutgers University study.

Read the entire article at www.app.com »

THE GARDENER STATE: They’re Baaack!

I first noticed them when visiting my son’s family in West Milford, then again when I visited the NJ Botanical Gardens in Ringwood State Park. They seemed to be everywhere, from crawling as youngsters to flying as adults. The trees were providing less shade than was expected for mid-June or July. It became obvious to this arborist and forester – they were back, and with a vengeance… By "they" I mean the dreaded gypsy moth – as young hairy caterpillars eating leaves and then as adult moths looking to lay eggs for next year’s onslaught… "The Department of Agriculture’s intense surveillance program is designed to keep gypsy moth populations at bay," New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher said. "When populations increase dramatically like this year, we will aggressively survey to determine the severity of next year’s gypsy moth problem and recommend spraying in areas where it is warranted."… This article was written by Nicholas Polanin, associate professor, agricultural agent II, Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station Cooperative Extension of Somerset County.

Read the entire article at www.mycentraljersey.com »