The Lost Art of Home Cooking Restored, Kid Style

The Cooking, Learning and Eating event was an opportunity for parents to get their kids cooking. Back row, L - R: Doug Duda; Former White House executive pastry chef and Rutgers Alum Bill Yosses; Diana Rice and Orti Polak. Front row, L - R: President of ChopChop Kids Sally Sampson and junior chefs Ella and Sher. Photo by Roy Groething

The Cooking, Learning and Eating event was an opportunity for parents to get their kids cooking. Back row, L – R: Doug Duda; Former White House executive pastry chef and Rutgers Alum Bill Yosses; Diana Rice and Orti Polak. Front row, L – R: President of ChopChop Kids Sally Sampson and junior chefs Ella and Sher. Photo by Roy Groething

IFNH and ChopChop Magazine Host Former White House Chef in Cooking Demo for Kids

Give a kid a fishstick and he will eat for a day. Teach a kid how to cook and he will go home and show his parents. It is no secret that wrapped in the intricate problem of the rise in childhood obesity and obesity-related diseases, is the profile of food eaten at home. The bygone era of a household with a stay at home parent that prepared meals from scratch, transformed into busy working caregivers who rely on processed convenience and/or fast food to fill hungry bellies. Unfortunately, food on the run often contains more empty calories than nourishment, and the consequences of poor nutrition are reflected in the increasing rates of chronic disease.

The New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health (IFNH), ChopChop Magazine and former White House pastry chef Bill Yosses, now the Director of the ChopChop Cooking Lab, are out to change that dynamic. With this common goal, IFNH and ChopChop in 2014 became partners in working to create healthy lifestyles at an early age, and in December, sponsored their first joint venture, hosting Yosses, a Rutgers alumnus (GSNB’78), for a hands-on evening for children and families teaching children about food and cooking, with a blend of science and fun. “Kids: Cooking, Learning and Eating” was held in Trayes Hall at the Douglass Campus Center. [Read more…]

More Snow Possible For the Shore This Weekend

Winter appears poised to become stormier in New Jersey… "I think it’s safe to say that there is a storm that’s looming for Saturday with the potential of delivering a plowable snow," said David A. Robinson, the New Jersey state climatologist… And it appears that this winter may more closely resemble last winter — the seventh snowiest on record in New Jersey- for a while, according to Robinson, a snow cover expert and geography professor at Rutgers University.

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Red Knot Protection Could Take Toll on Oyster Industry, Beach Replenishment

A recent decision by the federal government to list a migratory shorebird as a threatened species could have implications beyond the Delaware Bay beaches where the birds come each spring to feed on horseshoe crab eggs.. While wild oyster harvesting began locally in the 1730s, using the tidal flats to grow them, a French method known as "rack-and-bag" is relatively new… "There are nine growers on the Delaware Bay, though one is not active, and they grow 1.5 million oysters a year," said Lisa Calvo, aquaculture program coordinator with New Jersey Sea Grant at Rutgers University.

Read the entire article at www.pressofatlanticcity.com »

Restoring the Manalapan Brook Watershed: An Introduction

This video is the first in a series describing the restoration efforts within the Manalapan Brook watershed. The Manalapan Brook is part of the Raritan River Basin in central New Jersey. This introduction begins with a description of urban watershed problems throughout New Jersey such as polluted stormwater runoff, urbanization, and flooding. It provides examples of how local partners are trying to overcome these problems within Manalapan Brook watershed. Solutions such as naturalizing detention basins, shoreline restoration and floating wetland islands are presented.

Developed for New Jersey municipalities, residents and schools, the video was funded by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and project partners are Freehold Soil Conservation District, Monroe Township, Township of Manalapan, Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Middlesex County, Princeton Hydro, Middlesex County Parks and Recreation and Middlesex County Office of Planning.

Snow Could Slow Wednesday and Thursday Rush Hours

Drivers beware: The upcoming clipper snowstorm will impact the Wednesday afternoon commute, according to the National Weather Service. "It looks like it could be a two rush-hour event," said David A. Robinson, the New Jersey state climatologist. After the snow stops, "it could still leave roads pretty icy on Thursday morning." He speculated that "you could be talking about delayed (school) openings on Thursday, but it is going to get above freezing Thursday and that should clean things up."

Read the entire article at www.app.com »