European Expert George Marshall Discusses Why Our Brains Are Wired to Ignore Climate Change

George Marhsall during his presentation at the Cook Campus Center.

George Marhsall during his presentation at the Cook Campus Center.

On September 23, George Marshall, one of Europe’s leading experts on climate change communication, gave an engaging talk to a gathering of 200 Rutgers students, faculty, staff and members of the public at Rutgers Cook Campus Center about his latest book, Don’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Ignore Climate Change.

Marshall, a British citizen, has been on a quest to discover why people are inclined to ignore climate change even when presented with scientific facts. His research involved discussions with Nobel Prize-winning psychologists and the activists of the Texas Tea Party; the world’s leading climate scientists and the people who denounce them; liberal environmentalists and conservative evangelicals. One of his conclusions is that climate change is difficult to accept and that humans therefore construct a narrative that enables us to ignore it, reject it or shape it in our own image. [Read more...]

Rutgers professor develops ‘superfood’ lettuce

Blueberries are considered the gold standard of "superfoods" because of their high levels of polyphenols, beneficial compounds shown to protect against diabetes, cardiovascular disease, memory loss, inflammation and cancer. However, this seasonal fruit, often priced at a premium, is high in sugar content, requiring limited consumption by people on restrictive diets…A new superfood that’s low in sugar and available year-round and exceeds the high polyphenol content of blueberries hits the market this month. This high-polyphenol lettuce has been named Rutgers Scarlet Lettuce (RSL) – a tribute to Rutgers’ school mascot and color, the Rutgers Scarlet Knights, and is the brainchild of Rutgers Distinguished Professor in Plant Biology Ilya Raskin.

Read the entire article at MyCentralJersey.com »

Roger Barr, Retired Bergen County 4-H Agent, Inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame

Barr receiving his award from (l-r) Pam Van Horn, president NAE4-HA; Christina Alford, executive vice president, National 4-H Council; and Lisa Lauxman, director, Division of Youth and 4-H, Institute of Youth, Family and Community, NIFA, USDA.

Roger Barr receives his award from (l-r) Pam Van Horn, president NAE4-HA; Christina Alford, executive vice president, National 4-H Council; and Lisa Lauxman, director, Division of Youth and 4-H, Institute of Youth, Family and Community, NIFA, USDA.

Roger Barr of Upper Saddle River, NJ, was inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame on October 10 for his lifetime achievements and contributions to 4-H. The former Bergen County agent was honored by the New Jersey 4-H Youth Development Program of Rutgers Cooperative Extension and was one of 14 people inducted during the ceremony at the National 4-H Youth Conference Center in Chevy Chase, MD.

The National 4-H Hall of Fame honorees are nominated by their home states, National 4-H Council, the National Association of Extension 4-H Agents or 4-H National Headquarters based upon their exceptional leadership at the local, state, national and international levels.

The honorees were presented with National 4-H Hall of Fame medallion, plaque and memory book during the ceremony. The National 4-H Hall of Fame was established in 2002 as part of the Centennial Project of the NAE4-HA in partnership with National 4-H Council and National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA. For more information about the National 4-H Hall of Fame event and past recipients, visit www.nae4ha.com/hof. [Read more...]

Oyster farmers ride the wave of consumer tastes – Lawmaker offers his help to the shellfish growers

Aquaculture farmers in Middle Township are riding the leading edge of an oyster renaissance, a Rutgers marine scientist said recently, and last week independent growers in the area got the vocal support of a federal lawmaker in their pursuit to revitalize a once-great state industry…Not long ago, the lawmaker’s office reached out to Lisa Calvo, a Rutgers marine scientist working with eight oyster farmers in the township, and one in Cumberland County.

Read the entire article at Middle Township Gazette »

Rutgers Gardens celebrates nature at Fall Festival

Rutgers Gardens hosted its annual Fall Festival over the weekend to help raise funds for the 180-acre public garden. Bruce Crawford, director of Rutgers Gardens, said the festival is a fun day out intended to serve as a fundraiser and community awareness event. "As long as the gardens have been here, there are still a number of families who don’t know we exist," he said. "There’s nothing out front that screams ‘Rutgers Gardens.’"…The preserve, which opened in 1922, is tucked away off Ryders Lane between New Brunswick and East Brunswick.

Read the entire article at Sentinel »