What’s in Season from the Garden State: Making Bucks from Clucks, Not Books

Student Sustainable Farm interns (l-r) Angela Polites, Peter Canavan and David Perotti.

Student Sustainable Farm interns (l-r) Angela Polites, Peter Canavan and David Perotti.

Historically, young people were taught a trade by serving as apprentices or learning the ropes from a relative in a family business. While modern education emphasizes learning through books, classroom and lab experience, academia has increasingly embraced the value of hands-on involvement and commonly provides students opportunities for fieldwork or internships.

Agricultural entrepreneurship offers its own unique set of challenges, since there is a business management component in addition to agricultural production. What better way for modern-day college students to learn both aspects than to run their own agricultural enterprises, right on the college farm? At the Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS), a number of ag entrepreneurship opportunities have “cropped up” over the years. [Read more...]

Rutgers Turfgrass Breeding Program Director Wins Industry IMPACT Award

L-R: Phil Simon (University of Wisconsin), Bill Meyer with the NAPB IMPACT Award and Rita Mumm (University of Illinois).

L-R: Phil Simon (University of Wisconsin), Bill Meyer with the NAPB IMPACT Award and Rita Mumm (University of Illinois).

William Meyer, professor in the Department of Plant Biology and Pathology and director of the Rutgers Turfgrass Breeding Project, was awarded the 2014 National Association of Plant Breeders (NAPB) Impact Award at the association’s annual meeting held in Minneapolis, MN, on August 8.  According to the NAPB, its Impact Award “recognizes an individual active in the plant breeding field that has shown exceptional accomplishments in their research, teaching and collaborations with others.”

In addition to the NAPB Impact Award, Meyer has received many accolades, including the New Jersey Turfgrass Association Hall of Fame Award in 2009 and the Golf Course Superintendent’s Association John Morley Service Award in 2006. [Read more...]

Newsroom: The Online Portal for All Things SEBS & NJAES

Text

Text

Q: What is the SEBS/NJAES Newsroom?

A: The Newsroom is a website launched by the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences and the Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station that serves as a gateway for faculty, staff, students, alumni, and the various communities we serve to connect to our research, our faculty, staff, and student achievements, the multitude of events we host, and the work we do locally, nationally, and internationally. The writers on our staff contribute stories to the Newsroom, as well as stories from external news sources all over the world that cite an affiliate of SEBS/NJAES.

Q. What prompted the Office of the Executive Dean and Office of Communications to create the Newsroom?

A: We wanted to create a comprehensive resource that is designed to help everyone with their communication needs. The content already exists for you to use when communicating with your stakeholders, we just created the portal to make access to this information easier. It was also important for us to be able to archive and distribute the content we create to the appropriate stakeholder group, and the Newsroom allows us to easily manage that. [Read more...]

Somerset County 4-H members qualify for State 4-H Horse Show

Sixteen 4-H horse club members will represent Somerset County at the New Jersey State 4-H Championship Horse Show, Aug. 22-24, at the Horse Park of New Jersey in Allentown. More than 200 4-H members from throughout New Jersey will gather to compete in the English, Western, Dressage, Driving, Very Small Equine, Challenged Rider and Game Divisions…"The competing 4-H’ers are the best of the best from each county; they have earned the right to participate through county-level qualifying shows." said Carol Ward, County 4-H Agent…The 4-H Youth Development Program is part of Rutgers, New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station – Cooperative Extension.

Read the entire article at NJ.com »

Volunteers needed for Master Tree Steward program in Union County

One tree can absorb as much as 48 pounds of carbon dioxide per year. Trees also trap dust particles and other pollutants, and they help keep neighborhoods cool in the summer. These are just some of the many environmental benefits of planting and caring for trees in our community. For those interested in learning more about trees and teaching children, the Union County Master Tree Stewards program is seeking volunteers now…This program is one of the many adult volunteer opportunities offered by the Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Union County. Volunteers are essential to the successful implementation of the Master Tree Steward program.

Read the entire article at NJ.com »