Seeing Eye club members talk toils and joys of raising puppies

Abbey Hartman cried for two days after being separated from her puppy Nestle. These tears, however, turned into tears of joy soon when she reminded herself that Nestle would help a visually impaired person take control of his or her life. "I can imagine how hard it will be with Nestle," Hartman said. "But there is nothing but pride in my heart." Hartman, a Rutgers Business School junior, is the treasurer of the Rutgers University Seeing Eye Puppy Raising Club. The organization trains puppies to be Seeing Eye dogs for the visually and physically impaired.

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Rutgers Students Help Transform Part of Downtown New Brunswick in PARK(ing) Day 2014 Celebration

Video: Rutgers Students Help Transform Part of Downtown New Brunswick in PARK(ing) Day 2014 Celebration

On September 19, members of the Rutgers Student Chapter of the New Jersey American Society of Landscape Architects (NJASLA), working with its parent organization, helped in the design and installation of PARK(ing) Day 2014 in downtown New Brunswick. This annual event, which takes place on the third Friday in September, temporarily transforms metered parking spaces into “PARK(ing)” spaces, i.e. temporary public places to enjoy a variety of activities.

This year, officials with Middlesex County Planning and the City of New Brunswick, Rutgers students from the Department of Landscape Architecture and the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, along with several citywide civic organizations and businesses worked together to transform four parking spaces between 40-55 Bayard Street into public parklets.

Holly Nelson, instructor in the Department of Landscape Architecture and a practicing landscape architect, guided the students in rendering a park design for the Bayard Street parking spaces. “Events like PARK(ing) Day not only offer our undergraduates a unique opportunity for civic engagement; they also provide a serious design opportunity that reinforces our curriculum focus on urban and public spaces.”

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Rutgers discovery can change way to study diseases

Having discovered a new way to study tissues and organs more clearly, for these young scientific entrepreneurs the future seems, well, clear. In 2012, Tom Villani of Plainsboro, a Rutgers University student pursuing a doctorate in medicinal chemistry, set out to create a clearing agent for plants to replace the highly regulated chemical chloral hydrate.

Read the entire article at MyCentralJersey.com »

Bring Your Own Broomstick: University Quidditch Team Was a Key Factor in SEBS Student Choosing Rutgers

Rutgers Quidditch team, known as the Nearly Headless Knights.

Rutgers Quidditch team, known as the Nearly Headless Knights.

While the bludgers, quaffles and snitches have been adapted for muggles playing on solid ground rather than flying on broomsticks, the fantasy sport of Quidditch from the Harry Potter series is a real and competitive sport on many college campuses throughout the world. Nutritional sciences major Kristin Lawton is a huge Harry Potter fan and one of the 13 women on the Nearly Headless Knights team.  “My requirement when I applied to college is that the school have both a marching band and a quidditch team,” said Lawton, one of the team’s chasers. “Luckily Rutgers had both.” Read more at Rutgers Today.

Student Discovery Changing the Way We Study Cancer and Alzheimer’s Disease

Rutgers graduate students launch biotech start-up that has the potential to significantly alter the way tissue research is conducted.

In 2012, Tom Villani, a Rutgers student pursuing a Ph.D. in medicinal chemistry, set out to create a clearing agent for plants to replace the highly regulated chemical chloral hydrate. After months of development, Villani discovered a novel chemical clearing formula that he called Visikol™, which made plant tissues entirely transparent and performed better than chloral hydrate.

Tom Villani, who discovered Visikol™.

Tom Villani, who discovered Visikol™.

The next step for Villani and his colleague Nick Crider, vice president for process development at AL-G Technologies Inc., a startup biofuels company based in South Jersey, was to apply for a patent for this new chemical compound. To do so, they founded their own biotech startup, Phytosys, LLC., and began to market Visikol to academic institutions for use in lab experiments. They are still awaiting a patent, but have since secured over 100 Visikol customers, in both academia and industry, and across the United States, Europe and Asia.

In early 2014, Villani and Crider, now joined by Michael Johnson, a doctoral student in environmental sciences at Rutgers, began investigating additional applications for Visikol. They discovered that it had enormous potential in rendering whole animal tissues transparent, performing significantly better than competitive technologies like CLARITY, Scale, BABB and Focusclear®. [Read more...]