Barbara O’Neill Provides Saving for College Tips Via Tweetchat Forum

iStock_000007697683XLargeOn February 19, Rutgers Cooperative Extension Specialist in Financial Resource Management Barbara O’Neill was a guest “chatter” on WiseBread, a blog for millenials about “living large on a small budget.” O’Neill emphasized in the forum that even modest savings are helpful. “Any amount of college is better than none. what U can now & ramp it up over time ,” tweeted O’Neill. The Tweetchat engaged a wide audience, involving 78 contributors, 1262 tweets, 213,972 reach and 6,587,368 impressions. Read more highlights from the Tweetchat at WiseBread.

SEBS Student Catherine Seeds Receives Scholarship at Annual Breeders Awards Luncheon

Catherine (Kit) Seeds brings Cascade, a Standardbred mare, inside to get a monthly body weight check. Cascade, a research horse in Carey Williams’ program at the Best Management Practice Demonstration Horse Farm on Cook Campus, is one of the horses the research team refers to as their ‘Labrador Retriever’, due to her sweet nature and attention seeking. Photo by Samantha Hoy

Catherine (Kit) Seeds brings Cascade, a Standardbred mare, inside to get a monthly body weight check. Cascade, a research horse in Carey Williams’ program at the Best Management Practice Demonstration Horse Farm on Cook Campus, is one of the horses the research team refers to as their ‘Labrador Retriever’, due to her sweet nature and attention seeking. Photo by Samantha Hoy

Catherine Seeds, a senior at the Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (Animal Science 2015), is the recipient of the Ernest C. Bell Scholarship for 2015 that was presented at the Annual Breeders Awards luncheon, which was hosted by the New Jersey Department of Agriculture on January 25. Carey Williams, associate director for outreach at the Rutgers Equine Science Center and professor in the Department of Animal Sciences, presented the award to Seeds for her outstanding scholarship and commitment to the New Jersey horse industry.

Seeds, a G.H. Cook Honors student in the lab of Prof. Williams, has been deeply involved in the Animal Science program at SEBS. [Read more…]

Dyes Act as Probes to Aid Food Quality

Food dyes can give cakes, candy and sodas brilliant colors of the rainbow. Now, a team of food scientists at Rutgers University in New Jersey has found that food coloring may be able to play more than its traditional esthetic role in food presentation… The Rutgers researchers wondered if the edible colors already added to many food products could act as fluorescent probes… "Fluorescent probes have been used in many applications, but the idea of using food colors for this purpose is new," said Sarah Waxman, an undergraduate student who is working on a research project to study the fluorescent properties of food dyes in the lab of Rutgers food scientist Richard Ludescher.

Read the entire article at www.laboratoryequipment.com »

Rutgers Researchers Use Cold Plasma to Prevent Food Poisoning

Siddharth Bhide- a Rutgers food science graduate student- is about to clean or decontaminate fresh produce without using any water. He’s using cold plasma. This plasma is a ray of light created by heating up molecules- the sun itself is plasma. All over the country and the world, researchers and professionals are using cold plasma for dentistry, for cancer and wound treatment and to sterilize medical equipment… "That has the potential of cross contamination. So a bacteria can leave one fruit and go and attach to another fruit, and that’s also what we’re studying right now by the way. But this way, there is no possibility of cross contamination from one fruit to the other fruit. And because chlorine also has its own problems- environmentally as well as some other issues from the nutritional point of view," said Dr. Mukund Karwe, chair of the Rutgers Food Science Department.

Read the entire article at www.njtvonline.com »

Food Science Students Work on Produce Decontamination Via Cold Plasma

Washing produce can lead to cross contamination, while heating leads to loss of nutrients. Dean of International Programs and former Food Science Department Chair Mukund Karwe and food science graduate students explain this next level advancement in food science technology.

Video: Rutgers Cold Plasma Machine Fights Food Poisoning