Prof. Jessica Ware (SEBS ’08) Wins Prestigious NSF Early CAREER Award

Jessica Ware

Jessica Ware.

Rutgers-Newark biology professor Jessica Ware, who graduated with a Ph.D. in entomology in 2008, received an Early CAREER award worth $800,000 over the next five years from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Ware’s award will be used to examine how the social structure of lower-termite colonies might have arisen 140 million years ago, testing whether ecology and dietary shifts led to changes in diversification and morphology. Ware was one of two faculty members at Rutgers-Newark to win the prestigious NSF Early CAREER award that honors junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholar through outstanding research, excellence in teaching, and successful integration of the two. Read more.

Alumni Story: Phillip Gordon (AG ’63) – On Point

[Editor’s Note: In the spring 2015 issue of the SEBS magazine Explorations, the 1963 alumni class correspondent shared Phillip Gordon’s recollection about living on the Douglass campus, a blizzard and eating with the young women of Douglass at the Douglass College dining hall – punctuating the tale with “What a misfortune!” Phillip contacted us to correct some of the facts in the story. Below is the corrected version and much more of Phillip’s story.]

Phillip Gordon on the Mills College campus.

Phillip Gordon on the Mills College campus.

“While it was nice to see the mention on the ‘Alumni Notes and Musing’ page, it was not entirely accurate,” wrote alumnus Phillip Gordon. “Population growth at Rutgers College in the late 1950s and early 1960s led to a severe housing shortage. I spent my 1959-60 freshman year in the basement of, I believe, Leupp, in what was a barracks-like setup with an open space, beds, and metal storage cabinets.
[Note: Leupp Hall, built in 1929, is still a student residence on the College Avenue campus, with single and double rooms – no barracks, thankfully.]

“My 1960-61 sophomore year, they housed some of us on the Douglass campus, in one of two groups of small buildings [the Corwin Houses] that served as some of the Douglass dorms. During a blizzard, for one night, they opened the Douglass dining hall to us because we were stranded. Food deliveries to New Brunswick were mostly stopped, and College Avenue was impassable.”

With the story corrected, we asked Phillip to tell us more about what he recalled from that era and what he is doing now. [Read more…]

Alumni Story: Kate Sweeney (CC ’79) – Team Player

Kate Sweeney.

Kate Sweeney.

It’s part of her signature on personal emails: “Go RU!” She is a member of the university Board of Trustees, a regular at the games of the Scarlet Knights women’s basketball team, a familiar figure at High Point Solutions Stadium, “owns” a few greens on the Rutgers University Golf Couse, was co-chair of the search committee for the new athletic director, and more – in short, “an avid fan of all things Rutgers.”

A person of indefatigable energy who recently returned from a bird-watching adventure in Cuba, Kate Sweeney believes firmly in staying engaged. As Kate puts it, “When someone asks me to do something, I hardly ever say no.”

With a successful, busy career as a senior vice president, financial adviser and portfolio management director with Morgan Stanley in downtown New Brunswick, Kate holds Certified Financial Planner™ and Certified Investment Management credentials and enjoys a roster of clients that includes many who are associated with Rutgers. [Read more…]

Katie Fudacz (SEBS Dec. ’14): From Farm-to-Table to Bloomberg L.P.

Katie Fudacz at Monte Albán, a large pre-Columbian archaeological site in the Santa Cruz Xoxocotlán Municipality in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca.

Katie Fudacz at Monte Albán, a large pre-Columbian archaeological site in the Santa Cruz Xoxocotlán Municipality in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca.

When Katie Fudacz (SEBS Dec. ‘14) embarked on her G. H. Cook Honors Program thesis, little did she know it would be her calling card for several job offers in her senior year, including the one she finally chose with Bloomberg L.P.

“I really didn’t see myself working in the private sector,” said Fudacz. “As as a first-year student, I always envisioned myself working for a radical environmental organization like Greenpeace.” Fudacz majored in International Environmental Policy, with concentrations in sustainable agriculture, women’s leadership and Spanish.

She felt so deeply rooted in environmental policy that for three of her four years at Rutgers, she was a staff writer for The EPIB Trail, a monthly online newsletter written by students in the Department of Human Ecology that features eco-friendly ideas and current environmental news, plus departmental highlights of students, teaching assistants and faculty.

Fudacz was indoctrinated in environmental justice and policy even before she got to Rutgers. [Read more…]

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream and Scarlet Strawberries Were Among Attractions at Rutgers Day 2015

Rutgers Oceanography Club members at the Ag Field Day 2015 "What the Duck" booth where prizes were given for correct answers to marine trivia questions.

Rutgers Oceanography Club members at the Ag Field Day 2015 “What the Duck” booth where prizes were given for correct answers to marine trivia questions.

Ag Field Day, as it’s traditionally been known on the George H. Cook Campus, was a fun-filled event along with the other Rutgers Day activities for 2015. Read more at Rutgers Today.