Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream and Scarlet Strawberries Were Among Attractions at Rutgers Day 2015

Rutgers Oceanography Club members at the Ag Field Day 2015 "What the Duck" booth where prizes were given for correct answers to marine trivia questions.

Rutgers Oceanography Club members at the Ag Field Day 2015 “What the Duck” booth where prizes were given for correct answers to marine trivia questions.

Ag Field Day, as it’s traditionally been known on the George H. Cook Campus, was a fun-filled event along with the other Rutgers Day activities for 2015. Read more at Rutgers Today.

Six Receive George Hammell Cook and Dennis Fenton Distinguished Alumni Awards

L-R: Winners of the George Hammell Cook Distinguished Alumni Award David Rich, Richard Wolff and John Jengo.

L-R: Winners of the 2015 George Hammell Cook Distinguished Alumni Award are David Rich, Richard Wolff and John Jengo.

Six graduates of the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (and its predecessors) were honored with alumni awards for outstanding achievement at an annual luncheon and celebration on April 26, 2015, at the Cook Student Center.

The honorees receiving the George Hammell Cook Distinguished Alumni Award, given to those with undergraduate degrees from the school, are John W. Jengo, David Q. Rich, and Richard C. Wolff. Winners of the Dennis M. Fenton Distinguished Graduate Alumni Award, given to those whose graduate degrees were earned in school-based programs, are Margaret Brennan-Tonetta, Jennie C. Hunter-Cevera, and Cynthia Rosenzweig.

The George H. Cook Distinguished Alumni awards and the Dennis M. Fenton Distinguished Graduate Alumni awards are organized by the Cook Community Alumni Association. The Cook award was started in 1976 and the Fenton award in 2003. George Hammell Cook was instrumental in bringing Rutgers the designation as New Jersey’s land-grant institution in 1864. Dennis M. Fenton (GSNB ’77), was executive vice president of Amgen, Inc., and a strong supporter of and donor to the school and Rutgers. [Read more…]

The Arbor Trail

The Arbor Trail brochure, created in 1976 by then Cook College student Roy K. DeBoer. Click on image to view the entire brochure.

The Arbor Trail brochure, created in 1976 by then Cook College student Roy K. DeBoer. Click on image to view the entire brochure.

Rutgers environmental planning and design major Eliot Nagele (SEBS 2015), stumbled upon the remnants of a trail behind the University Inn and Conference Center when he was cleaning up a nearby creek in 2013. His work to renovate the trail and restore it as an outdoor classroom is documented in Unearthing a Buried Treasure, Parts I and II. The original trail was installed by Sydney Bleecker Carpender when he built the estate in 1911. After the purchase of the property by the University in 1965, the “Arbor Trail” was maintained and used by Cook College for a period as an outdoor classroom and a brochure was developed as a guide for the trail. Nagele notes that some of Carpender’s plantings mentioned in the brochure are still alive, specifically the Japanese maple and the weeping beech trees by the Inn. The story of the University’s use of the Arbor Trail is told by the former Landscape Architecture (LA) student who created the guide in the 1970s, Roy K. DeBoer (CC 1978), son of late Professor Roy H. DeBoer, and current LA Instructor.

DeBoer recalls, “I drew the Arbor Trail guide for the Estate back in 1976 at the request and under the direction of Dr. Bruce Hamilton, affectionately just known a “Doc”. My recollection is that his wife, Ellen, actually did the text and typing with him for copying. He taught the plant materials courses in the LA Dept. for many years, and was instrumental in getting the Alpha Zeta service fraternity and other members of the Cook College student body to participate via their labor to do significant work to rehabilitate the gardens back in the mid to late 70’s. The original sketches for the Arbor Trail were drawn at the size printed in the brochure, they were very small….. it was very low tech, and no budget. No computers, scanners, or digital anything to assist. It was all Xerox and cut and paste.” [Read more…]

Newark’s Cherry Blossoms Thrive with Rutgers’ Help

Paul Cowie demonstrates proper pruning protocol during the Master Gardener training.

Paul Cowie demonstrates proper pruning protocol while training Rutgers Master Gardeners.

Arborist Paul Cowie (CC ’85) and Jan Zientek (CC’82), senior program coordinator of Rutgers Cooperative Extension in Essex County, play key roles in maintaining the nation’s largest collection of flowering cherry trees in Essex County’s Branch Brook Park, leading a group of dedicated Rutgers Master Gardeners from Essex County. Branch Brook was the first county park in the nation, conceived by Frederick Law Olmsted, famous for his work on Central Park, and was designed by the Olmsted Brothers firm after he retired. The current collection of 4,300 trees, an expansion of the original 2,000 planted in the 1920s, is a testament to the efforts to restore the park to its former glory.  Read more at Rutgers Today.

Alumni Story: Zaid Abuhouran (SEBS ’12): Eyes on the White House

Zaid Abuhouran

Zaid Abuhouran

Zaid Abuhouran is headed for the White House – but not by way of a political campaign. Starting in July he will be on a six-month rotation with the White House’s Domestic Policy Council in the education office, working with President Obama’s team of close advisors on U.S. educational issues.

This plum assignment is part of Zaid’s internship with the Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) program, a highly competitive two-year training and development opportunity with the federal government. The prestigious program, launched in 1977, seeks “to attract to federal service outstanding citizen-scholars from a variety of academic disciplines and career paths who have a clear interest in, and commitment to, excellence in the leadership and management of public policies and programs,” according to the program’s website. [Read more…]