Botanists battle ‘plant blindness’ with seeds of knowledge

Since she began teaching at Rutgers 13 years ago, botany professor Lena Struwe has seen growing student interest in learning about plants. But that desire often comes without the basic plant knowledge that previous generations of students arrived on campus with…"Many times, I have to teach from scratch. ‘This is a petal. This is a leaf. This is a branch,’ " said Struwe, who, like plant-science educators across the country, bemoans what has come to be known as "plant blindness" or plant illiteracy among not just college students, but adults and children, too.

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Noel W. Hinners, Voice for Scientific Research at NASA, Dies at 78

Noel W. Hinners, a geologist and soil chemist who helped NASA launch some of its farthest-reaching scientific probes into space – to retrieve moon rocks, map the surface of Mars and peer beyond intergalactic dust to where stars are born – died on Friday in Littleton, Colo. He was 78…Dr. Hinners, who held various titles as an administrator and chief scientist for NASA in the 1970s and ’80s, was the main advocate for pure scientific research in an organization ruled by rocket engineers and pilots…Dr. Hinners graduated from Rutgers University in 1958 with a degree in soil science and agricultural research, and with thoughts of a career in agriculture.

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Scholarship Named for EcoPioneer Jerome Goldstein (RC 1952) Fuels Student Research at Rutgers EcoComplex

2014 Recipients of the Jerome Goldstein Scholarship Fund For EcoEntrepreneuring (l-r):
 Selen Altiok, Alec Roth and Boni Zhang. Ian MacCloud's (right) research was funded by the Entrepreneurial Agriculture internship program.

2014 Recipients of the Jerome Goldstein Scholarship Fund For EcoEntrepreneuring (l-r):
 Selen Altiok, Alec Roth and Boni Zhang. Ian MacCloud’s (right) research was funded by the Entrepreneurial Agriculture internship program.

What does one have to achieve to earn the reputation of “ecopioneer?” In the case of Jerome “Jerry” Goldstein, you could say he moved mountains. Mountains of compost, that is. As the editor and publisher of BioCycle and In Business magazines, and founder of JG Press, Inc., Goldstein’s enterprise and family business served as the foundation to grow the organics recycling industry in the U.S. and abroad. [Read more...]

Gulf of Maine: “Poster Child” for Global Warming

Imagine Cape Cod without cod. Maine without lobster. The region’s famous rocky beaches invisible, obscured by constant high waters. It’s already starting to happen. The culprit is the warming seas – and in particular the Gulf of Maine, whose waters are heating up faster than 99 percent of the world’s oceans, scientists say…"These changes are very real, and we’re seeing them happen quickly," said Malin Pinsky, a biology professor at New Jersey’s Rutgers University who studies ocean temperature change and was not involved in the research that resulted in the 99 percent statistic.

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Snow foolin’: Blizzards still likely despite global warming

Big snowstorms won’t be a distant memory, even with global warming, says a new study out Wednesday. The study finds that extreme snow events will still occur, even in a future with significant man-made climate change…"We often hear people claim that a big snowstorm is evidence that the climate is not warming, but these results make it clear that such storms do not provide much evidence about a changing climate," says Anthony Broccoli, professor of environmental sciences at Rutgers University.

Read the entire article at USAToday.com »