Rutgers EcoComplex: Building the Bioenergy Industry of New Jersey

EcoComplex Exterior.

Rutgers EcoComplex, a Clean Energy Innovation Center, is located in Bordentown, NJ.

The Rutgers EcoComplex is a nationally recognized center for sustainable biomass energy business incubation and clean energy cluster development. Designated a Clean Energy Innovation Center, it focuses on innovative bioenergy processes and was one of the first in the nation to serve as a university-based clean energy business incubator. It was recognized by the State of New Jersey with the “Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award” for setting a benchmark for top performance for the clean energy sector.

In keeping with the mission of NJAES, the EcoComplex takes a multi-pronged approach to building a sustainable bioenergy industry through applied research and demonstration, outreach and education, and business development. This facility proves that it “walks-the-talk” when it comes to bioenergy by conducting demonstration projects and helping start-up businesses further develop their technologies. Through these demonstrations, improvements can be made and the technologies verified to optimize their technical and economic performance. By offering these services and resources to entrepreneurs, the center helps to reduce barriers in the commercialization process.

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Trump’s Climate Proposals = "Existential Threat To This Planet," Michael Mann States

Donald Trump laid out his environmental policies in a speech last week in Bismark, North Dakota. As usual, The Donald spoke in broad generalities without giving specifics. He told his audience he would roll back President Obama’s climate change regulations, build the Keystone XL pipeline, and "cancel" the landmark Paris climate agreement… Other climate scientists were quick to echo Mann’s point of view. Jennifer Francis, a research professor at Rutgers University’s Institute of Marine and Coastal Science, noted that Obama’s Clean Power Plan and the Paris climate agreement are "absolutely critical steps in the right direction." She said reneging on the Paris climate agreement and rolling back the Clean Power Plan would be detrimental for future generations –  and to her personal patriotism.

Read the entire article at Clean Technica »

Trump Climate Policies Are An “Existential Threat To This Planet”

Donald Trump laid out his environmental policies in a speech last week in Bismark, North Dakota. As usual, The Donald spoke in broad generalities without giving specifics. He told his audience he would roll back President Obama’s climate change regulations, build the Keystone XL pipeline, and "cancel" the landmark Paris climate agreement… Jennifer Francis, a research professor at Rutgers University’s Institute of Marine and Coastal Science, noted that Obama’s Clean Power Plan and the Paris climate agreement are "absolutely critical steps in the right direction." She said reneging on the Paris climate agreement and rolling back the Clean Power Plan would be detrimental for future generations  – and to her personal patriotism.

Read the entire article at Gas 2 »

Cities as Novel Ecosystems: Adaptions to Urban Conditions

Are cities unnatural? Are urban landscapes disturbed or damaged? "There is no right answer. We can think of cities in many ways," says Dr. Paige S. Warren of the University of Massachusetts. "Cities are sources of novelty, hotpots of resource inputs, and drivers of evolutionary change.".. And what about the plants? With access to floras from 112 cities including both natural and spontaneous vegetation since 1975, Dr. Myla Aronson of Rutgers University along with the Urban Biodiversity Research Coordination Network (UrBioNet) is asking questions about the ways in which cities influence global, regional, and local patterns in plant diversity.

Read the entire article at PLOS Ecology Community blogs »

Climate change may be increasing NJ allergy problems, Rutgers expert says

A New Jersey researcher says milder winters and warmer seasonal air associated with climate change are having an impact on allergies by spawning more pollen… Leonard Bielory, a researcher at Rutgers University, says they find climate change is bringing out earlier and more intense releases of pollen. "Climate change has an impact in New Jersey in changing the amount of pollen being released over a different period of time," he said.

Read the entire article at NJ 101.5 »

July was the hottest month ever recorded on Earth

If you thought it was steamy here in New Jersey in July, with all those 90-degree days and triple-digit heat index readings, we weren’t alone. The entire planet had its warmest month ever recorded in any year, according to two federal agencies that track global temperatures… In New Jersey, July 2016 was the ninth hottest July since reliable records started being kept in 1895, said New Jersey State Climatologist David Robinson at Rutgers University. He noted that six of the 10 hottest Julys ever recorded in the state all occurred during the past 11 years: 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2016.

Read the entire article at The Star Ledger »

Hot enough for you? New Jersey has dealt with far worse summers

It may feel like the complete opposite when you step outside, but this summer in New Jersey isn’t that hot. At least not when you compare it to more than 120 years of weather records for the state. According to State Climatologist David Robinson at Rutgers University, summer 2016 so far has been "warm." "It has not been a record-breaking summer and it’s not likely to be," Robinson told New Jersey 101.5.

Read the entire article at NJ 101.5 »

Strongest Hurricane Season Since Sandy Expected This Year

Hear that roar? It’s the great Atlantic Ocean weather engine revving up. Climate experts warn there’s a 70 percent chance it could crank out more hurricanes than originally forecast – possibly the strongest season since 2012, which spawned Sandy… In fact, satellite photos show how Hurricane Sandy grew explosively when it crossed warm Gulf currents one day before making landfall as a tropical storm in New Jersey. And with less wind shear to blow away their tops, hurricanes can grow larger. Weaker winds also keep ocean waters warm by keeping colder water out of the mix, explains Rutgers’ Olaf Jensen. "When colder water from the bottom gets pushed up to the surface by winds and cools the surface water. So that hasn’t been happening as much this year as in the past," said Jensen.

Read the entire article at NJTV News »

Rate of sea-level increase speeding up, scientists say

Climate scientists have long warned of a rise in sea level as global warming melts the world’s glaciers. But while the level has been increasing at about 3.5 millimeters a year, the rate of increase itself has fluctuated, leading some people to doubt the warnings and the broader impact of rising carbon emissions. Fresh evidence, in a study published Wednesday in Scientific Reports, suggests the scientists were right, and that satellite measurements have been distorted by the eruption in 1991 of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines… Other recent volcanic eruptions haven’t had a major impact on sea levels because of the specific conditions needed to lower global temperatures, said Benjamin Horton, a professor in Rutgers University’s Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, who wasn’t involved in the study. Mr. Horton is an author of a study published in February showing that the rise in sea level in the 20th century was faster than in any of the previous 27 centuries.

Read the entire article at Pittsburgh Post-Gazette »

Climate science, nuclear strategy, and the humanitarian impacts debate

In the wake of research published in the past decade on the long-term effects of nuclear war, a humanitarian impacts movement has formed and become a rallying point for disarmament activists, as well as a source of passionate disagreement among nations… Modeling limitations, however, prevented any robust quantitative studies of climactic effects. Since 2007, Toon and Turco, along with Rutgers University environmental scientist Alan Robock and others, have produced studies that use state-of-the-art climate modeling to update previous estimates. Given the diminished likelihood of full-scale nuclear war between the United States and Russia, they focus their analysis instead on a nuclear conflict in South Asia.

Read the entire article at The Bulletin »