Maine Voices: At Hiroshima, Obama should begin leading world back from the brink

When President Obama speaks at ground zero in Hiroshima on Friday, he must do more than recall the horrific consequences of the first atomic bombing… In a series of professional journal articles, Rutgers environmental scientist Alan Robock, University of Colorado atmospheric and oceanic scientist Owen Brian Toon and others document that the likely impact of a so-called "limited nuclear war" on climate and global food production would put the world’s population at grave risk of mass starvation.

Read the entire article at The Portland Press Herald »

Bathroom not top priority

Thank you for your editorial "A transgender woman walks into a ladies room. So?" You rightly point out climate change is a "much more pressing" issue than which bathroom a transgender person can use… Arctic sea ice levels are on track to hit new record lows this year. The Arctic is warming faster than anywhere else on earth. According to the Washington Post, "We’re in record breaking territory no matter how you look at it," says Jennifer Francis, an Arctic specialist at Rutgers University who has published widely on how Arctic changes affect weather in the mid-latitudes.

Read the entire article at York Daily Record »

Scientists create world’s largest coral gene database

Coral reefs…have survived five major extinction events over the last 250 million years. Now, an international team of scientists led by Rutgers faculty has conducted the world’s most comprehensive analysis of coral genes, focusing on how their evolution has allowed corals to interact with and adapt to the environment… "There are a few key genes in corals that allow them to build this house that laid down the foundation for many, many thousands of years of corals," said Debashish Bhattacharya, a professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers. "It couldn’t be any more fundamental to ocean ecosystems." (Also appeared in Science Daily, Science Codex, eScienceNews, ScienMag.com, Science Newsline.)

Read the entire article at Phys.org. »

Canada wildfires in ‘bullseye’ of warming trends

Experts say climate change is contributing to the wildfires raging across Canada, and the increasing frequency of such fires may overwhelm one of Earth’s most important ecosystems, the boreal forest… "There is almost certainly a connection between the exceedingly warm Arctic, especially so this past winter, and the early fire season in high-latitude land areas, which includes much of Canada," said Jennifer Francis, research professor at Rutgers University.

Read the entire article at The Japanese Times »

Record-Breaking Heat Grips India Amid Rash of Farmer Suicides

Temperatures in India reached a record-breaking 123.8 degrees Fahrenheit Friday, according to the Associated Press, suffocating parts of the country, and drawing further attention to a tragic rash of suicide deaths among the nation’s impoverished farmers, who are battling drought and other environmental conditions that stifle agricultural production… "The heat wave in India is another example that our climate is changing," said Ben Horton, a scientist at the University of Rutgers who focuses on climate change. "We are now experiencing climate extremes that include droughts, wildfires, flood, storms, and tropical cyclones as well."

Read the entire article at WBT 1110 Charlotte »

Stuck on Hot: Earth Breaks 12th Straight Monthly Heat Record

Thanks to a combination of global warming and an El Nino, the planet shattered monthly heat records for an unprecedented 12th straight month, as April smashed the old record by half a degree, according to federal scientists… And more heat meant record low snow for the Northern Hemisphere in April, according to NOAA and the Rutgers Global Snow Lab.

Read the entire article at The New York Times »

N.J. decision ignites Shore strife: Oysters vs. red knots

A car door slammed on South Reeds Beach Road, and 300 feeding shorebirds – ruddy turnstones, sandpipers, and red knots – took wing, shrieking out over the Delaware Bay… "The U.S. Division of Fish and Wildlife has determined that these activities do not threaten the survival of the species," said David Bushek, director of Rutgers’ Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory in Port Norris. "There’s a bit of exaggeration about the dangers" of aquaculture, he said.

Read the entire article at Philly.com »

NJ’s cool start to May could be erased by the end of the month

You can tell just from walking outside, but the weather records prove this May in New Jersey is definitely cooler than usual… "Temperatures are averaging, daily highs and lows — in the upper 50s," Dr. David Robinson, the state climatologist at Rutgers University, told New Jersey 101.5. "And we should be, on average for the first part of May, in the lower 60s."

Read the entire article at New Jersey 101.5 »

Even for the fast-melting Arctic, 2016 is in ‘uncharted territory’

(This story has been updated) One of the oldest and best-established ideas about global warming is that it will hit the Arctic the hardest. The concept, which goes back to papers published decades ago, is called "Arctic amplification," and the basic idea is that there’s a key feedback in this system that makes everything worse… ‘We’re in record breaking territory no matter how you look at it," says Jennifer Francis, an Arctic specialist at Rutgers University who has published widely on how Arctic changes affect weather in the mid-latitudes. "The ice is really low, the temperatures are really high, the fire seasons have started earlier," she says.

Read the entire article at The Washington Post »

Canada wildfires in ‘bullseye’ of warming planet trends

Experts say climate change is contributing to the wildfires raging across Canada, and the increasing frequency of such fires may overwhelm one of Earth’s most important ecosystems, the boreal forest… "There is almost certainly a connection between the exceedingly warm Arctic, especially so this past winter, and the early fire season in high-latitude land areas, which includes much of Canada," said Jennifer Francis, research professor at Rutgers University.

Read the entire article at Phys.org »