Video: Prof. Paul Falkowski Discusses Climate Intervention as a Business Opportunity

In a collaboration with Rutgers Business School, Distinguished Professor Paul Falkowski talks about two interventions as business opportunities for reducing the effects of carbon dioxide build-up in the atmosphere.

Video: Climate intervention explained as a business opportunity

February Among Coldest on Record

If you spent any length of time outside during the month of February, chances are, you felt the bone-chilling cold. In fact, February 2015 will go down as one of the coldest on record… "We have statewide records that go back to 1895, and we are neck and neck right now with 1979 as being the second coldest February during that 121 year period," said Dave Robinson, New Jersey State Climatologist at Rutgers University. "We’re 4 degrees away from February 1934, which was the coldest of any month."… During the morning of February 21, the southern part of the state was exceedingly cold. It was 12 below zero in Berkeley Township, Ocean County and 7 below zero in Woodbine, Cape May County. A few days later, on February 23, Walpack, Sussex County went down to minus 20, Kingwood, Hunterdon County registered at 14 below zero and Hope, Warren County was minus 12.

Read the entire article at www.nj1015.com »

What If We Lost the Sky?

What is the sky worth? This sounds like a philosophical question, but it might become a more concrete one. A report released last week by the National Research Council called for research into reversing climate change through a process called albedo modification: reflecting sunlight away from earth by, for instance, spraying aerosols into the atmosphere. Such a process could, some say, change the appearance of the sky- and that in turn could affect everything from our physical health to the way we see ourselves… If albedo modification were actually implemented, Alan Robock, a professor of environmental sciences at Rutgers, told Joel Achenbach at The Washington Post: "You’d get whiter skies. People wouldn’t have blue skies anymore." And, he added, "astronomers wouldn’t be happy, because you’d have a cloud up there permanently. It’d be hard to see the Milky Way anymore."

Read the entire article at www.nytimes.com »

Rutgers Study Finds More Evidence for Link Between Wavy Jet Stream and Extreme Weather

Source: National Weather Service

Source: National Weather Service

Very wavy jet-stream patterns are affecting weather around the northern hemisphere, causing extremes of warm in the west and cold in the east. In a study published in IOPscience, climate scientist Jennifer Francis and University of Wisconsin-Madison scientist Stephen Vavrus link the wavy jet stream to a warming Arctic, where climate changes near the top of the world are happening faster than in Earth’s middle latitudes. Read more about the findings at Rutgers Today.

What’s Causing Freezing Temperatures Across the U.S.?

With temperatures in the teens in Washington D.C., the C&O Canal is frozen solid. So are tens of millions of people from Maine to the Carolinas… "And now to add insult to injury there’s been some of the coldest air in the last couple of decades invading the Northeast from the Arctic," says Dave Robinson, a professor of climatology at Rutgers University. He says what’s behind it all is the polar vortex…"The polar vortex is essentially the coldest air found in the Northern Hemisphere, and it’s situated up in the Arctic in the bulk of the winter," Robinson says. "But occasionally, a lobe of that will dip south above the jet stream and allow that cold air down into the Middle Atlantic states. Sometimes last winter, it was into the northern Plains."

Read the entire article at www.cbsnews.com »