Boonton Resident is Among Winners at County Fair

Local residents received high honors at the Morris County 4-H Fair, held on July 15-19 at Chubb Park in Chester. Youth and 4-Hers from Morris County were welcome to compete in divisions such as photography, woodworking, fine art and crafts with projects completed prior to the fair. Projects were judge based on the Danish system; awarded excellent, very good, good or fair ribbons. These judged projects were on display during the fair… Also winning big in the foods division was Boonton native Arianne Grevesen, a member of the Buckanears 4-H Small Animal Club. She received a best in show for her cannoli cupcakes in the Backed Goods Unit Grades four-eight… The Rutgers Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth Development Program uses a "learn by doing approach to enable youth to develop the knowledge, attitudes, and skills they need to become competent, caring and contributing citizens of the world."

Read the entire article at www.northjersey.com »

4-H Science Ambassador Program Helps Rahway Students Gain Knowledge Through Research

Children at the Rahway Public Library got a fun introduction to the principles of the scientific method this summer from a group of volunteer Union County 4-H Science Ambassadors. The projects included blowing bubbles and a simple "ski slope" demonstration… 4-H is a national youth development program. In Union County, 4-H is supported by the Freeholder Board, Rutgers University’s Cooperative Extension, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture… To prepare for their Rahway Library presentation in July, they attended the 4-H Summer Science Program at Rutgers University earlier in the month. They lived on campus at the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences during the one-week program, learning about scientific investigation as it relates to current issues and challenges.

Read the entire article at www.nj.com »

Find Out How Big the Largest Tomato Contest Winner is at N.J. Fair

11-year-old Cody Wright is by far the youngest of the nine competitors at the Salem County Fair’s Largest Tomato Contest, but he has something the other competitors don’t have. He has a pedigree… The tomato contest has a loyal following – with a lot of the same faces competing each year. Cody took the third place trophy last year and, as he enrolls in the competition this year with his primo red tomato, he sizes up the other tomatoes… David Lee, Salem County agricultural agent for the Rutgers University Cooperative Extension, runs the competition and weighs the tomatoes… "Everybody has their own secret and they don’t like to tell but some guys will stay up all night and put night lights on them and covers on them and grow them on straw and use special fertilizer," Lee said. "Everybody has their own thing."

Read the entire article at www.nj.com »

New Brunswick Community Farmers Market – “Community” is Our Middle Name

New Jersey FoodCorps member Thalya Reyes and New Brunswick pre-schooler Julio, savoring the fragrance of fresh basil at New Brunswick Community Farmers Market.

New Jersey FoodCorps member Thalya Reyes and New Brunswick pre-schooler Julio, savoring the fragrance of fresh basil at New Brunswick Community Farmers Market.

National Farmers Market Week (August 2–8, 2015) is a week-long celebration of our nation’s farmers markets, the farmers and ranchers who make them possible, and the communities that host them. This year marks the 16th annual National Farmers Market Week recognizing the important role that farmers markets play in our local food economies. A perfect example of a model farm market that really gives back to the community is the New Brunswick Community Farmers Market, a project in partnership with the City of New Brunswick, Rutgers Cooperative Extension, and Johnson & Johnson.

For New Brunswick Community Farmers Market, “community” really is their middle name. Besides bringing New Jersey farm fresh produce into urban New Brunswick, the market hosts a number of ways for residents to grow their own and connect with fresh local food.

Senior Program Coordinator Sarah Dixon describes how the market enables residents to obtain fresh food. “The New Brunswick Community Farmers Market was started in 2009 to offer New Brunswick residents – especially those at risk for food insecurity – access to fresh, locally grown, affordable, nutritious, and culturally appropriate produce and other food products. Whenever you spend any kind of nutrition assistance dollars with us (such as WIC or SNAP) we give half back in Market Bucks to help stretch food budgets to include Jersey Fresh produce during the harvest season.” The market is more than a just vending location. Dixon continues, “Our home base on Jones Avenue started as a 36 raised-bed community garden, and has grown over the years to include a children’s garden, lots of additional growing spaces, hoop houses, a greenhouse, a chicken coop, beehives, and a vermicomposting bin. The gardens are grown and maintained by the community, with frequent volunteer support.”

[Read more…]

New City School Names Alexis Wright Next Head of School

Alexis Wright has been unanimously selected by New City School’s Board of Trustees to serve as the next Head of School. Alexis comes to New City School from Bank Street College of Education in New York, NY, where he has served as Dean of Children’s Programs and Head of School since 2009… Alexis has had experience with progressive schools with a focus on experiential learning as well as a more traditional school that implements innovation in the learning process. Prior to Bank Street, Alexis held several positions at Rye Country Day School in New York, including Assistant Head of School, Director of Financial Aid, and Principal of the Middle School. He also served as Principal of the Middle School at The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools… Alexis received his M.A. in Marine Affairs and Policy and a B.S. in Human Ecology from Rutgers University.

Read the entire article at www.interact.com »