Prof. Benjamin Horton Wins European Geosciences Union Award

Prof. Ben Horton teaching a Byrne Seminar, a one-credit course designed to introduce first-year students at Rutgers-New Brunswick to academic life.

Prof. Ben Horton teaching a Byrne Seminar, a one-credit course designed to introduce first-year students at Rutgers-New Brunswick to academic life.

Benjamin Horton, professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, was named the winner of the Plinius Medal by the European Geosciences Union (EGU). The award, which honors scientists for their important contributions to the Earth, planetary and space sciences, will be presented at the EGU 2016 General Assembly to be held in Vienna in April.

Horton’s research concerns sea-level change. He aims to understand and integrate the external and internal mechanisms that have determined sea-level changes in the past, and which will shape such changes in the future.

“It’s such a big moment for me,” said Horton. “As an American scientist, to be recognized by the European Geosciences Union is a great honor.” [Read more…]

Rutgers EcoComplex Awarded USDA Grant to Study Feasibility of Renewable Energy from Food and Animal Waste

L-R: Howard Henderson, USDA; Dave Specca, Rutgers EcoComplex; Douglas Fisher, NJ Secretary of Agriculture; and Rob Fulper III, Fulper Family Farm.

L-R: Howard Henderson, USDA; Dave Specca, Rutgers EcoComplex; Douglas Fisher, New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture; and Rob Fulper III, Fulper Family Farm. Photo: Cynthia O’Grady.

 

The Rutgers EcoComplex was awarded a Rural Business Development Grant of $19,000 by the USDA Rural Development Office to perform a technical and economic feasibility study of co-digestion of food waste and dairy manure at Fulper Family Farms, located in West Amwell Township.

Announcing the grant was Howard Henderson, the state director of USDA Rural Development Office, who was joined by New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas Fisher at Fulper Farm on Nov. 23 to also award a $250,000 USDA grant to Fulper Family Farms to expand its dairy product line.

While the ultimate goal is to spur rural development and job creation in Hunterdon County, the grant to the EcoComplex, a unit of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station (NJAES), will study the feasibility of mixing food waste and animal manure in an anaerobic digester to produce renewable energy in the form of biomethane, explained Dave Specca, assistant director of the EcoComplex, who accepted the grant on behalf of Rutgers. [Read more…]

Award-Winning Journalist Andrew Revkin Launches SEBS 250th Anniversary Focusing on the Anthropocene

Journalist and SEBS Executive Dean’s 250th Anniversary speaker Andrew Revkin picks up on Executive Dean Goodman’s question: will Rutgers be here in 250 years?

Journalist and SEBS Executive Dean’s 250th Anniversary Lecture speaker Andrew Revkin picks up on Executive Dean Goodman’s question: will Rutgers be here in 250 years?

As we celebrate Rutgers 250th anniversary, will Rutgers see its 500th anniversary? This was one of the questions Executive Dean Bob Goodman challenged the audience to consider as the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences launched its 250th Anniversary celebration events under the theme, “Exploring the Anthropocene: The Age of Us,” on November 12.

Tony Broccoli, co-director of the Rutgers Climate Institute and professor in the Depatment of Environmental Sciences, introduced the speaker, Andrew Revkin, adding that Revkin “did his homework.” Broccoli went on to say that Revkin has played a very important role in reporting science topics and climate science to the public since the mid-1980s.

Andrew Revkin, an award-winning science journalist, New York Times blogger @dotearth, and senior fellow at Pace University, delighted the audience in Trayes Hall during the first Executive Dean’s 250th Anniversary Public Lecture Series. At times conversational and reflective, and at other times more serious but never confrontational, it was clear that Revkin had a message to share. [Read more…]

Rutgers Dedicates NJ Institute of Food, Nutrition, and Health: Addressing Real-World Problems Associated with Food and Health

L-R: Rutgers President Robert Barchi; Robin Mockenhaupt, chief of staff, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; New Jersey Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno; Chancellor Richard L. Edwards, Rutgers University-New Brunswick; Executive Dean Robert Goodman, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers-New Brunswick; Peter Gillies, institute founding director; and Antonio Calcado, vice president, University Facilities and Capital Planning. Photo credit: Jeff Heckman

L-R: Rutgers President Robert Barchi; Robin Mockenhaupt, chief of staff, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; New Jersey Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno; Chancellor Richard L. Edwards, Rutgers University-New Brunswick; Executive Dean Robert Goodman, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers-New Brunswick; Peter Gillies, institute founding director; and Antonio Calcado, vice president, University Facilities and Capital Planning. Photo credit: Jeff Heckman.

The dedication of the nearly 80,000-square-foot New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition, and Health facility on the George H. Cook campus took place on October 27. The facility offers nearly 40,000 square feet of research space and approximately 30,000 square feet of community space to facilitate communication and cooperation among scholars who pursue interdisciplinary research; policymakers who apply research to real-world problems associated with food and health; and parents, their children and students whose lives can benefit from wellness programs and health and education activities. The institute will serve as a university-wide hub for interdisciplinary research whose mission is to make New Jersey the “Healthy State” and a model for the nation. Read more at Rutgers Today.

Mark Robson Named Distinguished Service Professor by Rutgers Board of Governors

Mark Robson. Photo: Matt Rainey.

Mark Robson. Photo: Matt Rainey.

Mark Robson, professor and chair of the Department of Plant Biology and Pathology, has been named a Distinguished Service Professor by the Rutgers Board of Governors (BOG). Robson, who was presented with a resolution at the board meeting on Oct. 14 by BOG chair Greg Brown, was recognized for “sustained and exceptional service to the University, to the academic profession, to the state or nation, or to the broader community by a faculty member at the full professorial rank.” Executive Dean Bob Goodman introduced Robson at the meeting.

“I am so proud to be a professor at Rutgers and it is an honor to provide service to our students and the university, but especially serve the community beyond the university,” said Robson, upon getting the award.

Robson thanked Bonnie McCay, distinguished professor emerita of the Department of Human Ecology, for nominating him for this special recognition in a letter to Dean Goodman. “In addition to his university, state, and national service, Mark’s service also includes an impressive global component. He has made significant impacts globally with his NIH and USAID projects,” wrote McCay.

In expressing his gratitude to the BOG and to Dean Goodman for the honor, Robson underscored his strong roots and support at Rutgers that have enabled him to reach into and serve the community, both here and abroad.

“Rutgers has been the path for all my adult life, first teaching me what it is to be a good servant and then allowing me to take that knowledge and share it with places like Aceh, Indonesia, or Rangsit, Thailand or Cuttington, Liberia.” [Read more…]