All Senior IFNH Student Ambassadors Successfully Matched for Dietetic Internships

From the left: Bill Cornelius, Taylor Palm, Cortney Flynn, and Rebecca Tonnessen

L-R: Bill Cornelius, Taylor Palm, Cortney Flynn and Rebecca Tonnessen

April 3 was the highly anticipated “Match Day” for senior dietetic students to find out whether they get matched for a dietetic internship, a requirement to become a registered dietitian. The Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health (IFNH) Student Ambassadors work diligently over the course of their undergraduate careers to achieve their dreams of becoming dietitians. All the hard work has paid off for the 2016 class of IFNH Student Ambassadors, all four of whom received a match on “Match Day.”

Congratulations to Taylor Palm, who was matched to Sodexo-Allentown Dietetic Internship, and to Bill Cornelius, Cortney Flynn and Rebecca Tonnessen, all three of whom were matched to the Rutgers University Dietetic Internship.

These programs are highly selective and receiving a match is a major accomplishment for dietetic undergraduates who wish to become dietitians. The process is competitive, with the national match rate to a dietetics program at only 52 percent.

Statewide Efforts of Family and Community Health Sciences Gain Recognition

FCHS Chair Kathleen Morgan accepted the Culture of Health Award on behalf of the department. Photo: Jeff Heckman.

FCHS Chair Kathleen Morgan accepted the Culture of Health Award on behalf of the department. Photo: Jeff Heckman.

The work of the Department of Family and Community Health Sciences (FCHS) was recognized by the YMCA Alliance, in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, with a Culture of Health Award.

The award, presented at the Culture of Health Conference in New Jersey, “honors individuals and communities that are creating partnerships and deep commitments to drive local change, ensuring all residents have an opportunity to make healthy choices in their schools, workplaces and neighborhoods.”

According to Kathleen Morgan, chair of FCHS, who accepted the award on behalf of the department, these “Culture of Health” communities have worked through the development of deliberate policies, programmatic, environmental and systems changes designed to help each community sustain these changes over time, with the overall goal of improving health. [Read more…]

Rutgers Revolutionary: Cracking the Genetic Code of Plants

Joachim Messing at his investiture as Chair of Molecular Genetics at Rutgers.

Joachim Messing at his investiture as Chair of Molecular Genetics at Rutgers.

Prof. Joachim Messing, among the world’s top experts in molecular genetics, became famous for developing a genetic engineering technique used in laboratories to create plants that have produced disease-resistant crops considered vital to feeding the world’s population. Instead of cashing in on his discovery, he gave this scientific blueprint away for free to his fellow scientists around the world. Read more on this Rutgers Revolutionary at Rutgers Today.

Prof. Benjamin Horton Wins European Geosciences Union Award

Prof. Ben Horton teaching a Byrne Seminar, a one-credit course designed to introduce first-year students at Rutgers-New Brunswick to academic life.

Prof. Ben Horton teaching a Byrne Seminar, a one-credit course designed to introduce first-year students at Rutgers-New Brunswick to academic life.

Benjamin Horton, professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, was named the winner of the Plinius Medal by the European Geosciences Union (EGU). The award, which honors scientists for their important contributions to the Earth, planetary and space sciences, will be presented at the EGU 2016 General Assembly to be held in Vienna in April.

Horton’s research concerns sea-level change. He aims to understand and integrate the external and internal mechanisms that have determined sea-level changes in the past, and which will shape such changes in the future.

“It’s such a big moment for me,” said Horton. “As an American scientist, to be recognized by the European Geosciences Union is a great honor.” [Read more…]

Rutgers EcoComplex Awarded USDA Grant to Study Feasibility of Renewable Energy from Food and Animal Waste

L-R: Howard Henderson, USDA; Dave Specca, Rutgers EcoComplex; Douglas Fisher, NJ Secretary of Agriculture; and Rob Fulper III, Fulper Family Farm.

L-R: Howard Henderson, USDA; Dave Specca, Rutgers EcoComplex; Douglas Fisher, New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture; and Rob Fulper III, Fulper Family Farm. Photo: Cynthia O’Grady.

 

The Rutgers EcoComplex was awarded a Rural Business Development Grant of $19,000 by the USDA Rural Development Office to perform a technical and economic feasibility study of co-digestion of food waste and dairy manure at Fulper Family Farms, located in West Amwell Township.

Announcing the grant was Howard Henderson, the state director of USDA Rural Development Office, who was joined by New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas Fisher at Fulper Farm on Nov. 23 to also award a $250,000 USDA grant to Fulper Family Farms to expand its dairy product line.

While the ultimate goal is to spur rural development and job creation in Hunterdon County, the grant to the EcoComplex, a unit of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station (NJAES), will study the feasibility of mixing food waste and animal manure in an anaerobic digester to produce renewable energy in the form of biomethane, explained Dave Specca, assistant director of the EcoComplex, who accepted the grant on behalf of Rutgers. [Read more…]