SEBS & NJAES Faculty and Staff Receive 2015 Celebration of Excellence Awards

2015 Rutgers SEBS Celebration of Excellence AwardsThe 22nd annual “Celebration of Excellence Awards Luncheon” of the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences and the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station (NJAES) was held on April 23 at the Neilson Dining Hall on the Cook/Douglass Campus. Rick Ludescher, dean of academic programs at the school, served as Master of Ceremonies while Executive Dean Bob Goodman addressed the luncheon attendees and presented certificates or plaques to the winners.

Each year, the leadership at the school and NJAES recognizes the outstanding contributions of those in our community who have brought distinction to themselves and their programs. Congratulations to all whose outstanding creativity, original work and ideas, innovation, effectiveness, integrity, leadership, impact, community engagement and overall excellence were so honored. [Read more…]

Climate Change Affecting High-Altitude Regions at Faster Rate

Global warming is occurring at an accelerated pace in many high-altitude regions around the world and among the consequences could be water shortages, according to a new study co-authored by Rutgers climate scientist Jim Miller. A professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Miller collaborated with an international team of scientists on a new study published in the journal Nature Climate Change. The researchers say evidence is showing that global warming often occurs more rapidly in high mountains and that further study is needed to fully grasp the true impact of the phenomenon… "Water is going to be a major problem over the next few decades anyway and climate change is going to exacerbate it," Miller said. "Who gets the water? Are you going to use the water to grow crops or are you going to use the water to fill swimming pools in LA? Those are ultimately social and political decisions. With climate change, those changes could be more dramatic."

Read the entire article at www.scienceblog.com »

Climate Change Affecting High-Altitude Regions at Faster Rate, Rutgers Study Finds

Global warming is occurring at an accelerated pace in many high-altitude regions around the world and among the consequences could be water shortages, according to a new study co-authored by Rutgers climate scientist Jim Miller… A professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Miller collaborated with an international team of scientists on a new study published in the journal Nature Climate Change. The researchers say evidence is showing that global warming often occurs more rapidly in high mountains and that further study is needed to fully grasp the true impact of the phenomenon… "Somewhere on the order of 1 billion people a day don’t have access to good clean water," Miller said. "Climate change will exacerbate that and what happens in mountains is going to be a major part of that." Globally, the team of researchers found that as altitude rises, the rate of temperature change often accelerates. In the past 20 years, temperatures above 4,000 meters (13,120 feet) have warmed 75 percent faster than at altitudes below 2,000 meters (6,560 feet).

Read the entire article at www.thejerseytomatopress.com »

Scientists Pore Over Warm West, Cold East Divide

The curiosity of a growing group of researchers has been piqued by the tenacious temperature divide that has separated East from West over the past two winters as a wild zigzag of the jet stream has brought repeated bouts of Arctic air and snow to the East and kept the drought-plagued West baking under a record-breaking dome of heat… That study, also detailed in Geophysical Research Letters, suggests that while the Pacific heat set the atmospheric pattern in motion, Arctic sea ice loss in a particular region made the warm/cold difference so extreme, said Jennifer Francis of Rutgers University… Francis, who wasn’t involved with either study, is one of the main proponents of an idea that by altering how much heat the ocean lets out, sea ice melt and Arctic warming also can change atmospheric circulation patterns, in particular by making the jet stream form larger peaks, or highs, and troughs, or lows. Hence the more intense difference between East and West the last two winters.

Read the entire article at www.greenbiz.com »

Unearthing a Buried Treasure, Part II: Student’s Vision for Trail Renovation Enabled by Fellow Students

Eliot Nagele by one of two man-made ponds that are part of the trail.

Eliot Nagele (SEBS 2015) stands by one of two man-made ponds that are part of the trail.

The Arbor Trail is located behind the University Inn and Conference Center on the Douglass Campus. Rutgers purchased the property in 1965. The Inn is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year and the trail will have its grand re-opening on Rutgers Day 2015 on April 25, as part of the Inn’s anniversary celebration. Student volunteers will give tours of the trail and there will be giveaways of wildflower seed mix.

In 1908, armed with a degree in mechanical engineering, young Sydney Bleecker Carpender began his business career with the Brunswick Refrigerating Company, a manufacturer of refrigerating and ice-making machinery. Carpender became the company’s vice-president and general manager in 1911, at age 27. That same year he had a manor built on his family’s property in New Brunswick for him and his wife, the former Louise Johnson, daughter of one of the founding brothers of Johnson & Johnson. A horticultural enthusiast, Carpender created a unique man-made landscape on the estate complete with rolling meadows, ponds and a wooded trail established with select landscape plantings and trees. [Read more…]