Past Climate Change Was Caused by the Ocean, Not Just the Atmosphere

Most of the concerns about climate change have focused on the amount of greenhouse gases that have been released into the atmosphere. But in a new study published in Science, a group of Rutgers researchers have found that circulation of the ocean plays an equally important role in regulating the earth’s climate…"We argue that it was the establishment of the modern deep ocean circulation – the ocean conveyor – about 2.7 million years ago, and not a major change in carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere that triggered an expansion of the ice sheets in the northern hemisphere," says Stella Woodard, lead author and a post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences.

Read the entire article at spacedaily.com »

NJ more vulnerable to storms, flooding after Sandy

New Jersey’s vulnerability to powerful storms and coastal flooding is rising, and it will take at least 10 years to become more resilient, experts say. In Superstorm Sandy’s wake, officials last year sought innovative proposals on how to increase resilience in communities and along susceptible shorelines…Anthony J. Broccoli, a professor and co-director of the Rutgers Climate Institute, said "the risk of flooding from coastal storms is going to be changing dramatically over the course of the rest of this century and the risks will be increasing. That’s not because the storms (have) changed. It’s because the sea level is rising."

Read the entire article at TheDailyJournal.com »

Our climate change is related to deep ocean currents and glaciations

The mapping of currents deep in the oceans has been a protracted study. A combination of deep ocean sediment core samples and NASA imaging now reveal that climate change is affected at least as much by the sea as by the air temperature. Rutgers University academics Stella Woodard, Yair Rosenthal, Kenneth Miller, James Wright, with Kira Lawrence (Lafayette College) and Beverly Chiu, all contributed to the paper in the journal Science that puts a new perspective on climate change.

Read the entire article at earthtimes.org »

Arctic Sea Ice Volume 2014: Decline Leads to Colder Winters in Europe and Asia

A new study found a link between declining Arctic sea ice and the colder winters experienced in Europe and Asia near the Northern Hemisphere. Researchers from Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute at the University of Tokyo performed 200 computer simulations showing what happens when the ice melts in the Barents-Kara area. The model revealed that ice declines in the region doubled the coldness of winters in Europe and Asia…The findings of the study are similar to an earlier study performed by Jennifer Francis of Rutgers University, who initially suggested a link between declining sea ice and extreme weather change at the Northern Hemisphere.

Read the entire article at hngn.com »

Rutgers Hosts 7th Annual Pioneers in Endocrinology Workshop

Dipak Sarkar makes opening remarks at the workshop. Photo: Kathy Manger.

Dipak Sarkar makes opening remarks at the workshop. Photo: Kathy Manger.

“Hormones and Cancer” was the theme of the 7th Annual Pioneers in Endocrinology Workshop held last month at the Busch Campus Center. This annual daylong workshop was sponsored by the Rutgers Endocrine Program; Department of Animal Sciences at the Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS); Rutgers NJAES Cooperative Extension; and Rutgers-RWJMS Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition. Almost 100 students, postdocs, faculty, and staff attended the event, which comprised morning presentations and an afternoon poster session.

Director of the Rutgers Endocrine Program Dipak Sarkar, distinguished professor of Animal Sciences, SEBS Executive Dean Robert Goodman, and Rutgers Senior Vice President for Research and Economic Development Christopher Molloy, distinguished professor in Pharmacology and Toxicology, welcomed the participants and gave opening remarks.

Louis Amorosa, professor of Medicine and chief, RWJMS Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Nutrition, introduced the first invited speaker, Suzanne A.W. Fuqua, professor of Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine’s Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center. Her talk was titled “Rediscovery of Estrogen Receptor (ESR1) Mutations in Breast Cancer.” A question-and-answer session following this talk was led by Carol Bagnell, professor of Animal Sciences. [Read more...]