Rutgers Turfgrass Program Raises $400,000 for Henry Indyk (AG ’50) Graduate Education Fellowship

Henry Indyk

Henry Indyk

The Rutgers Turfgrass Program has raised a total of $400,000 to support the Henry Indyk Endowed Graduate Fellowship at the university. Thanks to a $61,000 donation from the New Jersey Turfgrass Association (NJTA) and the New Jersey Turfgrass Foundation (NJTF) in March, the seven-year capital campaign has met its goal of continuing support of graduate education at the university.

According to Bruce Clarke, chair of the Department of Plant Biology and Pathology and director of the Center for Turfgrass Science, this fundraising effort was initiated in 2007 to provide an ongoing source of funding for graduate students in turfgrass science at Rutgers. Clarke expressed appreciation “to the NJTA and NJTF for their tremendous support of the Henry Indyk Endowed Graduate Fellowship, to the tune of more than $150,000 in funding since we started our campaign.” [Read more...]

A Brutal Allergy Season Is Ahead. Blame the Polar Vortex.

One week ago, I purchased the first asthma inhaler I’ve owned since the 8th grade. …"We’re expecting a lot of cases like you," my doctor told me as he wrote my prescription. "It’s going to be a hell of a pollen season." And for that, you can blame the polar vortex—the extreme cold system that repeatedly hovered over much of the United States this year—along with the rest of this winter’s brutal weather. …While no single weather event—the cold snaps that caused this year’s pollen vortex, for example—can be directly attributed to global warming, the science community is engaged in a lively debate over whether climate change is making unusual weather events, including severe cold temperatures, more likely. Jennifer Francis, a research professor at Rutgers University, argues that the rapidly warming Arctic has caused the jet stream to slow, which could result in atmospheric events, such as winter storms, staying put for longer…The future may offer a reprieve from agonizing allergy seasons. Leonard Bielory, an environmental sciences professor at Rutgers, predicted in Scientific American that a warming planet will eventually cause pollen counts to taper off. "It cannot continue on a linear scale," he said. "If heat goes up to a certain temperature, plants will die. It will hit a breaking point." Of course, at that point, a prolonged allergy season won’t be high on the list of problems.

Read the entire article at Mother Jones »

Rutgers Marine Field Station Director Ken Able Talks on Its History

The Tuckerton Historical Society is hosting Ken Able, ichthyologist and the director of the Rutgers Marine Field Station, at its Giffordtown Schoolhouse Museum on Saturday, April 26, from 2 to 4 p.m. Many boaters would recognize the Rutgers Marine Field Station as they motor from Barnegat Bay to Great Bay and beyond.

Read the entire article at The SandPaper.net »

Think the past winter was bad? Get ready for mini Ice Age

Scientific speculation is intensifying that a new mini Ice Age is looming. The last mini Ice Age struck the northern hemisphere about A.D. 1450 and lasted 400 years. It was dubbed the "Little Ice Age." In Canada, it had a huge impact on everything from crop yields to changing ecosystems…Rutgers University Global Snow Laboratory reports northern hemisphere snow cover has been increasing significantly since 1998; it reached 46.81 million square kilometres in 2014. According to NASA, the solar cycle, which will peak in 2022, is among the weakest in centuries and will enhance cooling.

Read the entire article at Winnipeg Free Press »

Cities support more native biodiversity than previously thought

The rapid conversion of natural lands to cement-dominated urban centers is causing great losses in biodiversity…“While urbanization has caused cities to lose large numbers of plants and animals, the good news is that cities still retain endemic native species, which opens the door for new policies on regional and global biodiversity conservation,” said lead author and NCEAS working group member Myla F.J. Aronson, a research scientist in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

Read the entire article at Hawaii Reporter »