Adapting to Shifts in Marine Species Due to Climate Change Research Available on New Website

Malin Pinsky

Malin Pinsky

During the past 18 months, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolution Malin Pinsky has published two papers documenting and exploring the implications of the trend of marine species shifting to cooler waters as a result of climate change. He and his team have found that the shift northward is happening at different rates among the species not because of their biological differences but due to the rate and direction of climate change in their waters. A new website has been created with the data behind this research available to explain how the ecology, business and economics of sport and commercial fishing are connected to the effects of global warming and the difficulty in adapting to the resulting changes. Read more at Rutgers Today.

How Rutgers and World of Warcraft ‘corrupted blood’ could help Ebola response

Virtual worlds where real-life gamers role play as they come across deadly challenges may have much to teach us about confronting a global crisis. At least that’s what Nina H. Fefferman, a Rutgers professor, concluded after studying human behavior when a glitch occurred in the online game World of Warcraft in 2005. It led to panicked and some irrational behavior on the part of participants, after a mistaken incident of ‘corrupted blood’ spread quickly through the game, killing off virtual characters.

Read the entire article at www.newsworks.org »

With electric jackhammers, plans to quiet an earsplitting city sound

At one Midtown Manhattan construction site recently, the difference between the pneumatic and electric models was palpable, both to Mr. Guzman and to Eric M. Zwerling, the president of the Noise Consultancy, who was enlisted by The New York Times… Armed with an audiometer, Mr. Zwerling, who is also director of the Rutgers Noise Technical Assistance Center, took readings at Mr. Guzman’s ear and from seven feet away. He found about a 15-decibel difference between the two models, which he said was surprising and extremely significant, both in terms of the worker and community exposure.

Read the entire article at www.nytimes.com »

Rutgers drops cafeteria trays to reduce waste

Lindsay Yoakam used to load her tray in the dining halls at Rutgers with three or four plates: usually soup, salad, dinner and a dessert that she may, or may not, eat… "I was probably throwing out a good amount,” said Yoakam, a senior nutritional sciences major from Mount Laurel… With the cost of food rising 8 to 10 percent a year, dining services eliminated trays this semester at the Neilson, Busch and Livingston dining halls… In addition to saving money and reducing food waste, some students found that eliminating trays led to healthier eating.

Read the entire article at www.centraljersey.com »

Big Ten Network Spotlights Rutgers Seeing Eye Puppy Raising Club

The four legged students attending Rutgers earn a special degree. Watch the Big Ten Network “LiveBIG” YouTube feature of the Rutgers Seeing Eye Puppy Raising Club.

Video: 2014-15 LiveBIG: Rutgers Seeing Eye Puppy Raising Club