Study Looks at Sea-level Rise Due to Polar Ice-Sheet Loss During Past Warm Periods

Ben Horton

Ben Horton

In a study published in the journal Science, Professor of Marine and Coastal Sciences Ben Horton and an international team of scientists concluded that 125,000 years ago, when global average temperature was 1°C higher than pre-industrial levels, sea levels rose 20 to 30 feet higher than present. Sea level peaked somewhere between 20 and 40 feet above present levels during an earlier warm period about 400,000 years ago, when global average temperatures are less certain, but estimated to be about 1 to 2°C warmer than the pre-industrial average. Read more at Rutgers Today.

How to Make it Rain in the Desert: UAE Fires Salt Rockets in Attempt to Seed Clouds and Trigger Much-Needed Downpours

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is trying to squeeze every last drop of rain from its clouds by launching salt missiles into them from planes. The technique is known as cloud seeding, and its purpose is to increase condensation in the hope that it might trigger a downpour… A leading academic told how he got a mysterious phone call asking whether foreign countries could be triggering droughts or flooding. Professor Alan Robock, from Rutgers University in New Jersey, said: ‘Consultants working for the CIA rang and said we’d like to know if someone is controlling the world’s climate would we know about it?’ ‘Of course they were also asking – if we control someone else’s climate would they then know about it."… The professor is one of many scientists from around the world are actively looking at manipulating the weather as a way of combating climate change. Professor Robock told the callers that any attempts to meddle with the weather on a large scale would be detectable.

Read the entire article at www.dailymail.co.uk »

5 Things Everyone Should Know About Washing Food

Everybody eats, and no one wants to eat something that could make you sick. But there’s a lot of misinformation out there about how and whether you should wash your food… Food safety is an important issue. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that each year one in six people in the United States will get sick because of food-borne illness. And risks can be increased or decreased at every point between the farm and your fork. Yes, you want to make sure to cook your food to the appropriate temperature, but here are some other tips to help you make good decisions in the kitchen… "Any time you’re going to eat fresh produce you should rinse it off, if for no other reason than to rinse off dirt," said Don Schaffner, a food safety researcher at Rutgers. "And rinsing off produce may offer some risk reduction in terms of microbial pathogens."

Read the entire article at www.pulse.com »

Underwater Robot Tracked Ocean Sediment During Hurricane Sandy

A Teledyne Webb autonomous underwater glider RU23 belonging to Rutgers University deployed off the New Jersey coastline in 2012… In October 2012, Hurricane Sandy struck the northeastern United States around New Jersey and devastated a number of large metropolitan areas, including New York City. However, for all the destruction and chaos it wrought, the storm also allowed researchers to closely monitor a host of environmental and physical phenomena associated with a storm of such magnitude… The glider used optical and acoustic backscatter- techniques similar to radar in which sound or light is bounced off of surroundings and analyzed upon return- to survey the water for sediment particles of two different sizes (0.4 and 0.1 millimeter) commonly used in models. It observed that both particle sizes got completely suspended in the water column during the 24-hour period of peak storm intensity.

Read the entire article at www.eos.org »

Some Like It Sweet, Others Not So Much: It’s Partly in the Genes

A new study from Monell and the QIMRBerghofer Research Institute suggests that a single set of genes affects a person’s perception of sweet taste, regardless of whether the sweetener is a natural sugar or a non-caloric sugar substitute… "Eating too much sugar is often seen as a personal weakness. However, our work suggests that part of what determines our perception of sweetness is inborn in our genetic makeup," said study author Danielle Reed, PhD, a behavioral geneticist at Monell. "Just as people born with a poor sense of hearing may need to turn up the volume to hear the radio, people born with weak sweet taste may need an extra teaspoon of sugar in their coffee to get the same sweet punch."… Also contributing to the research were Paul Breslin of Monell and Rutgers University, and Gu Zhu, Nicholas Martin, and Margaret Wright of QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute.

Read the entire article at www.healthcanal.com »