Rutgers Awarded Three of Seven Grants Totaling $5 Million to Study Climate Impacts on Commercial and Recreational Fisheries

Grace Saba, assistant professor, Center for Ocean Observing leadership, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences.

Grace Saba, assistant professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences.

NOAA’s Climate Program Office and its Coastal and Ocean Climate Applications (COCA) program—in partnership with the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Office of Science and Technology—competitively awarded seven grants projects last year that focused on increasing the understanding of climate-related impacts on fish stocks and fisheries. Three of the seven grants totaling roughly $5 million were awarded to Rutgers faculty members, Grace Saba, assistant professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Enrique Curchitser, associate professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Malin Pinsky, assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution & Natural Resources.

Both commercial and recreational fisheries provide an important source of jobs, food, recreation and economic activity for the nation and it is vital that these fisheries remain sustainable and resilient. Climate-related impacts have negatively affected marine life and the people, businesses, communities and economies that depend on them. In order to better prepare and respond to these changes, key decision makers from the groups affected need more information.

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Professors Bhattacharya and Falkowski Lead International Team in Analysis of Coral Genes

Professors Debashish Bhattacharya and Paul Falkowski. Photo by Todd B. Bates

Professors Debashish Bhattacharya and Paul Falkowski. Photo by Todd B. Bates

An international team has conducted a comprehensive analysis of coral genes, focusing on how their evolution has allowed corals to interact with and adapt to the environment. Professors Debashish Bhattacharya and Paul Falkowski led a coral gene database study that was published in the journal eLife. The study stems from an international coral genomics symposium and workshop held at Rutgers in February 2014 that was funded by the National Science Foundation. Also, a stony coral study was published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences last month. Read more at Rutgers Today.

Revolutionary for 250 Years: Enos Perry

Rutgers Revolutionary Enos Perry.

Rutgers Revolutionary Enos Perry.

Dairy Farms Used to be Dangerous

Enos J. Perry (1891-1983) served Rutgers University from 1923 to 1956 as an extension specialist in dairy husbandry. His greatest contribution to agriculture was the establishment of the first cooperative artificial breeding association for cattle in New Jersey and the U.S. and the practical application of the technique of artificial insemination (AI) of farm animals, thus ending the days of dangerous bulls on U.S. dairy farms. Visit http://sebsnjaesnews.rutgers.edu/2014/03/100-years-of-cooperative-extension-rutgers-dairy-specialist-enos-j-perry-making-agricultural-history/

World’s richest source of oceanographic data now operational at Rutgers

The National Science Foundation awarded $11.8 million to Rutgers to launch and operate the Ocean Observatories Initiative’s data system. The data center for the pioneering Ocean Observatories Initiative, which collects and shares data from more than 800 sophisticated instruments and a transmission network across the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, is now operating at Rutgers University… "Rutgers is now the hub for the world’s richest source of new in-water oceanographic data, and we are extremely proud to have been chosen for this important work," says Christopher J. Molloy, Rutgers’ senior vice president for research and economic development.

Read the entire article at MyCentralJersey.com »

Bed bugs have favorite colors

Do you have favorite colors? So does a bed bug. And a new study shows that, like many humans, bed bugs change their color preferences as they age… Changlu Wang did some of the earlier research showing adult bed bugs prefer red and black. Also an entomologist, he works at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J. Wang agrees that getting rid of red or black bedding wouldn’t necessarily help people fight bed bugs.

Read the entire article at Science News for Students »

SEBS Prof. Participates in Research Study Mapping Availability of Female Condom in Philadelphia Area

David Tulloch.

David Tulloch.

Collaborating with researchers at Rutgers University-Camden, David Tulloch , professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture and associate director of the Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis, where he leads the Geohealth Lab research group, synthesized data about HIV/AIDS and interventions in the Philadelphia/Camden area into an informative and powerful map. The map, along with other results, were published in the journal, AIDS and Behavior, showing that one percent of the 1228 service providers contacted sold/provided the female condom and 77% sold/provided the male condom. Juxtaposed against a map of HIV prevalence, the limited availability of female condoms has serious health and policy implications for communities throughout the city. Read more on the study.

The National Science Foundation Has Awarded $11.8 Million to Rutgers

OOI-Station-Map_Cabled_Array_2015-01-12World’s Richest Source of New In-Water Oceanographic Data Now Operational at Rutgers

The National Science Foundation has awarded $11.8 million to Rutgers to launch and operate the Oceans Observatories Initiative’s data system.

The data center for the pioneering Ocean Observatories Initiative, which collects and shares data from more than 800 sophisticated instruments and a transmission network across the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, is now operating at Rutgers University. Read more at Rutgers Office of Research and Economic Development.

Tropical Plant Called Moringa Shows Promise in Health, Anti-Aging Products

Ilya Raskin is seeking cures and treatments for ailments afflicting hundreds of millions of people… Raskin’s laboratory at the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences studies the health benefits of crops and medicinal plants. A major focus is on revealing the molecular effects of chemical compounds in plants, vegetables and fruits on chronic diseases, including inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and gut problems.

Read the entire article at The Jersey Tomato Press »

Tropical plant called moringa shows promise in health, anti-aging products

lya Raskin is seeking cures and treatments for ailments afflicting hundreds of millions of people. And he’s trying to find them – along with anti-aging and other beneficial compounds – in myriad plants in 20 countries on four continents. Raskin’s laboratory at the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences studies the health benefits of crops and medicinal plants.

Read the entire article at Phys.org »

Prof. Pal Maliga Honored for Excellence in Plant Biology Research by National Society

Pal Maliga.

Pal Maliga.

Pal Maliga, distinguished professor in the Waksman Institute of Microbiology and professor of plant biology in the Department of Plant Biology and Pathology, has won the Lawrence Bogorad Award for Excellence in Plant Biology Research from the American Society of Plant Biologists.

Maliga received a master’s degree in genetics and microbiology from the Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary, in 1969 and a doctoral degree from the Jozsef Attila University, Szeged, Hungary, in 1972. From 1971 through 1982, Maliga held appointments at the Biological Research Center, Szeged, Hungary, where his research group pioneered mutant isolation, organelle transfer and genetic recombination in cultured tobacco cells.

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