Horsemen urge voters to say ‘yes’ on casino referendum

The future of New Jersey’s equine industry may depend on voter’s response to a referendum on the November ballot expanding casino gambling beyond Atlantic City… Dr. Karyn Malinowski, the director of the Rutgers Equine Science Center (RESC), said that racing is not the only discipline that loses if casino gaming is not expanded outside of Atlantic City. She points out there will be little incentive for young people planning a career in the equine industry to stay in the state should the referendum fail.

Read the entire article at NJ.com »

Using Gardens to Improve Community Health and Manage Stormwater Runoff

Shiloh Community Garden.

Shiloh Community Garden.

The Shiloh Community Garden in downtown New Brunswick has been the focal point of a unique health project that seeks to foster positive physical, emotional, and social health outcomes for an underserved city population: uninsured clients of Elijah’s Promise Soup Kitchen. These clients, who receive free primary care through the Promise Clinic, a volunteer clinic run by medical students associated with Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, obtain gardening skills while they learn about healthy food and improving personal health.

Through the efforts of Richard Alomar, assistant professor, and Megan Pilla, graduate student, in the Department of Landscape Architecture, sketching at the Shiloh Community Garden has been integrated into the community-based project. Pre-and post-health assessments will evaluate whether the experience leads to positive health outcomes, and sketching journals will document the work recollections and attitudes of the participants. The results will inform future Elijah’s Promise programming, community gardening expansions, further scholarship in community-based health, and an expanded study. The project, a collaboration of Elijah’s Promise, the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and Rutgers, is funded by a Community-University Partnership grant.

[Read more…]

Faculty Focus: Distinguished Prof. Bingru Huang Works on Improving Turfgrass Stress Tolerance for China’s Growing Industry

Bingru Huang examines turf samples in the greenhouse.

Bingru Huang examines turf samples in the greenhouse.

As China’s economy is growing and the population is increasing, China’s turfgrass industry is rapidly expanding due to the increasing needs for general landscaping and sports fields. The GDP of the turf-related industry in China is over 3 billion yuan and is expected to increase by 30–50 percent each year.

One of the major issues facing China’s turfgrass industry is limited water resources for irrigation. Restricted use of fresh water and increased use of recycled water present challenges to the rapidly growing turfgrass industry in China with respect to maintaining quality turf on general landscape and sports fields due to drought and salinity stress.

[Read more…]

Reviving seeds of Campbell’s tomato legacy

Surveying the basket of tomatoes in the middle of a table at the Center for Environmental Transformation in Camden, a teenager wearing a Captain Planet T-shirt plucked a small round tomato out of the mix, a Campbell’s 146. "I like this one because it sounds like an experiment," Dimitrius Eliza said. The tomato was an experiment of sorts, one of many tomatoes bred by the Campbell Soup Company in Camden soil…. The J.T.D. was later crossed with the Marglobe to create the Rutgers, which was introduced in 1934; as evidenced by the name, Rutgers University worked in conjunction with the company to develop new varieties. With the Rutgers, Sonke said, "The two primary characteristics they were breeding for was something that would ripen more uniformly…but the other thing they were looking for was disease resistance."

Read the entire article at Courier-Post »

Urban High School Students Dive Deep into Science at Rutgers University

Summer Science Students.

Summer Science Students.

Annual 4-H Summer Science Program was held July 11-15 on the Cook Campus

Over sixty high school students from Elizabeth, Newark, New Brunswick, Passaic, Paterson, Trenton, Rahway and Atlantic City participated in hands-on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) activities alongside Rutgers faculty at the 8th annual 4-H Summer Science Program on the Rutgers-New Brunswick campus.

“The students spent a week with Rutgers scientists–touring their labs, learning about their research, and how their scientific inquiry is relevant to our daily lives,” said Chad Ripberger, Rutgers Cooperative Extension (RCE) 4-H agent, Mercer County. And because the students were living on campus, they also got a taste of university life.

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Middlesex County set for 78th annual fair

One of Central Jersey’s largest events, the Middlesex County Fair, promises fun, farm and animal flair as the venture gets ready to start its 78th year in "business."… Celebrating 250 years of Rutgers: The Middlesex County Fair is one of several county fairs celebrating Rutgers’ 250th anniversary with special interactive displays designed to bring attendees closer to the revolutionary history of its state university. For generations, Rutgers has been a vital partner in the Garden State’s county fair tradition through Rutgers Cooperative Extension and its 4-H Youth Development Program. To honor the milestone anniversary, all of the state’s county fairs will feature the theme, "Rutgers. Revolutionary for 250 Years." Fairgoers will have the chance to be a part of history under a special tent that recreates the Nov. 10, 1766 signing of the charter that launched Queens College, the precursor to Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Interactive cut-out figures for photo opportunities and "Rutgers 250" plant breeding products are also new this year.

Read the entire article at My Central Jersey »

Rutgers turfgrasses prized at Baltusrol, PGA event site

When the world’s top male golfers gather at the legendary Baltusrol Golf Club this week, they will be playing on numerous turfgrasses developed by Rutgers University.

Read the entire article at My Central Jersey »

Rutgers Equine Science Center kicks off 15 years of excellence

Close to 100 people attended the 2016 Rutgers Equine Science Center summer showcase in the kickoff celebration of the center’s 15-year anniversary… Welcoming remarks were given by Dr. Karyn Malinowski, director of the Equine Science Center, Dr. Wendie Cohick, chair of the Department of Animal Sciences, and Dr. Brad Hillman, senior associate director of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station and director of research. The event continued with the presentation of a Congressional Certificate from U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross (D-1) by Sharon Ortepio, chair of the Equine Advisory Board, a part of the New Jersey Department of Agriculture. The center was honored with a ceremonial proclamation from the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders, sponsored by Lillian Burry.

Read the entire article at Greater Media Newspapers »

Rutgers Turfgrasses Prized at Baltusrol Golf Club, Host of 98th PGA Championship

When the world’s top male golfers gather at the legendary Baltusrol Golf Club this week, they will be playing on numerous turfgrasses developed by Rutgers University… Rutgers has a decades-long record of breeding and cultivating top-performing turfgrasses, according to Bruce B. Clarke, extension specialist in turfgrass pathology and director of Rutgers’ Center for Turfgrass Science, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary… To date, Rutgers has developed more than 400 varieties of turfgrasses and licensed them to more than 20 companies, according William A. Meyer, professor and director of turfgrass breeding at Rutgers… "Anywhere cool-season grasses are being grown in a sports stadium, there’s a very good possibility that it’s a Rutgers grass, maybe not the entire stadium, but part of it," said James A. Murphy, Rutgers’ extension specialist in turfgrass management. "It’s sold all over the world."

Read the entire article at Tap Into »

Sustainable Raritan River Collaborative Recognizes Eight Stewards of the Raritan River and Bay

2016 awardees, left to right. Front row: Walter Lane and Tara Kenyon of Somerset County Planning Division; Jim Waltman and Kate Hutelmyer of Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association; Bill Schultz, Raritan Riverkeeper; Rosana Da Silva and Chris Obropta of Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program; Julia Somers of the Highlands Coalition; Larry Jacobs and Beth Davisson; Eric Zwerling. Second row: Cody Obropta, Maithreyi Thukaram, Dominick Cardella, Tyler Obropta, Adam Cucchiara, Kaylene Campbell, Tekla Pontius-Courtney with Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program. Third row: Brittany Musolino, Erin Stretz and Mike Pisauro of Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association; Debbie Mans; Bill Kibler; Michael Catania. Not shown: Candace Ashmun. Photo credit: Nick Romanenko.

2016 awardees, left to right. Front row: Walter Lane and Tara Kenyon of Somerset County Planning Division; Jim Waltman and Kate Hutelmyer of Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association; Bill Schultz, Raritan Riverkeeper; Rosana Da Silva and Chris Obropta of Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program; Julia Somers of the Highlands Coalition; Larry Jacobs and Beth Davisson; and Eric Zwerling. Second row: Cody Obropta, Maithreyi Thukaram, Dominick Cardella, Tyler Obropta, Adam Cucchiara, Kaylene Campbell and Tekla Pontius-Courtney with Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program. Third row: Brittany Musolino, Erin Stretz and Mike Pisauro of Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association; Debbie Mans; Bill Kibler; and Michael Catania. Not shown: Candace Ashmun. Photo credit: Nick Romanenko.

Extension specialist Chris Obropta and the Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program Team, along with director of the Rutgers Noise Technical Assistance Center Eric Zwerling—in his capacity as a Readington Township Board of Education member and chairperson of the Green Committee—were among eight individuals and organizations to receive 2016 Sustainable Raritan River Awards at the 8th Annual Sustainable Raritan Conference and Awards Ceremony held at Rutgers on June 10.

“The purpose of these awards is to recognize some of the more creative and impressive accomplishments by genuine leaders throughout the Raritan Watershed,” said Michael Catania, executive director of Duke Farms Foundation and a member of the Sustainable Raritan Awards Committee.

Each year at its Annual Conference, the Sustainable Raritan River Collaborative and the Sustainable Raritan River Initiative give awards to recognize outstanding achievement in efforts to revitalize, restore and protect the Raritan resources and promote the area as a premiere place to live, work and raise a family.

Rutgers University launched the Sustainable Raritan River Initiative in 2009 to bring together concerned scientists, environmentalists, engineers, businesses, community leaders and governmental entities to craft an agenda that meets the goals of the U.S. Clean Water Act to restore and preserve New Jersey’s Raritan River, its tributaries and its bay. The Initiative, a joint program of the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy and the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, partners with other Rutgers schools, centers and programs to ensure the best contributions from the sciences, planning and policy. [Read more…]