Bear Cub Mystery in NYC: Explaining Recent Black Bear News

This week, a young black bear was found dead in New York City’s Central Park. The six-month-old female had been likely killed by a car, though how she got into the heart of the biggest city in the United States is still a mystery, according to news reports…National Geographic spoke with Brooke Maslo, a wildlife specialist at Rutgers University with extensive knowledge of black bears, about the recent events and what to do if you encounter a bear.

Read the entire article at National Geographic »

Bear attack in West Milford happened after warning from hikers, was ‘one in a million,’ experts say

The five hikers who were apparently attacked by a bear last month in West Milford, with one ending up dead, were warned along the trail by hikers who said they were being followed by the animal, authorities said today…"Bears are generally fearful of humans, and will avoid interactions with people whenever possible," added Brooke Maslo, an assistant professor at Rutgers University’s Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources.

Read the entire article at NJ.com »

Ken Able Honored with NOAA Fisheries Habitat Conservation Award

Ken Able addressing a local group with a focus on fish and fisheries research at the Rutgers University Marine Field Station.

Ken Able addresses a local fisheries group at the Rutgers University Marine Field Station in Tuckerton, NJ.

Ken Able, distinguished professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences and director of Rutgers University Marine Field Station (RUMFS) at Tuckerton, NJ, was chosen as the 2014 recipient of the Dr. Nancy Foster Habitat Conservation Award from NOAA Fisheries, Office of Habitat Conservation.

“The Dr. Nancy Foster Habitat Conservation Award is the most prestigious award in the country given in recognition of an individual’s contributions to the restoration and conservation of marine and coastal habitats,” said Rich Lutz, director of the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers. “What a wonderful honor it is for Rutgers to have one of its most sterling scientists recognized as the worthy recipient of this year’s Dr. Nancy Foster Habitat Conservation Award.”

Able’s research at RUMFS focuses on the life history and population dynamics of larval and juvenile fishes in the relatively undisturbed Mullica River–Great Bay estuary and along the east coast of the U.S. In 1989, Able introduced weekly monitoring of larval and juvenile fishes in the estuary. This weekly monitoring, which continues today by RUMFS, is part of a broader analysis of issues of habitat quality for estuarine fishes in natural and impacted estuaries that stretches from New York Harbor to the Gulf of Mexico.

“Habitat conservation and restoration are increasingly important issues in the management of the nation’s coastal resources and for that reason, my colleagues and I from the Rutgers University Marine Field Station feel particularly honored by this award,” said Able.

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The Hot Pepper Potential: Rutgers Ag Research Aims for Alternative Markets in New Jersey and the Region

Habaneros are among the exotic hot peppers with growing market potential.

Habaneros are among the exotic hot peppers with growing market potential.

It’s hard to be neutral about hot peppers. People often run, pardon the pun, hot or cold when it comes to these spicy meal additions. Those with “seasoned” taste buds may ply their dishes with daring degrees of spiciness, while others who fear the burn decline to indulge. But hot peppers offer more than a spicy bite to meals and present some other uses that can turn up the heat on its market potential. [Read more...]

Student Film Features Professor’s Battle Against White Nose Syndrome in Bats

Marine and Coastal Sciences major Jill Azzolini (SEBS 2015), who worked as a summer intern with Day’s Edge Productions, used her newly-acquired digital filmmaking skills to create a short film of Rutgers Assistant Research Professor of Wildlife Biology Brooke Maslo’s work on reviving bat populations that have been decimated by White Nose Syndrome. Azzolini was able to design an internship that enabled her to combine her creativity and enthusiasm with her interest in the environment in the production of this short film. Read more about Azzolini’s work on the film.

Video: Fight for Flight: The Battle Against White Nose Syndrome