Containing Ebola Like They Did in This Video Game [AUDIO]

Public health officials need to be able to predict how outbreaks like Ebola spread and grow. But that’s not so easy. Mainly because it requires knowing how real people will react. Human behavior ain’t so easy to plug into a computer model. But, then there was this bizarre and totally accidental video game incident that made real life disease outbreak modeling smarter. The story of "corrupted blood" in World of Warcraft is still inspiring epidemiologists. (Featuring Professor Nina Fefferman, department of Ecology, Evolution, & Natural Resources)

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Big brown bats in N.J. thrive as smaller cousins decline

While New Jersey’s little brown bat population, ravaged by a fungal disease, continues to slip toward likely extinction, another species, the big brown bat, appears to be benefiting, with its numbers rising by as much as 50 percent in the state since white nose syndrome first hit in 2009, according to experts studying the species…Banding efforts in New Jersey have led researchers to conclude that while the overall numbers are still declining, the survival rate for hibernating little brown bats in New Jersey has been increasing slightly each year. The rate was 66 percent in 2010, and 71 percent last winter, according to research conducted by the state Department of Environmental Protection and Brooke Maslo, a wildlife ecologist at Rutgers University.

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Seeing Eye club members talk toils and joys of raising puppies

Abbey Hartman cried for two days after being separated from her puppy Nestle. These tears, however, turned into tears of joy soon when she reminded herself that Nestle would help a visually impaired person take control of his or her life. "I can imagine how hard it will be with Nestle," Hartman said. "But there is nothing but pride in my heart." Hartman, a Rutgers Business School junior, is the treasurer of the Rutgers University Seeing Eye Puppy Raising Club. The organization trains puppies to be Seeing Eye dogs for the visually and physically impaired.

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Rutgers Professor’s ‘Super Lettuce’ To Hit Grocery Store Shelves Saturday

Thanks to a Rutgers professor, one of our healthiest foods has gotten healthier and the product is hitting grocery store shelves on Saturday. "[It's]The first time I think something really good happened to lettuce, because it’s the second most commonly consumed vegetable in the world and yet it’s not known for anything good or bad and now it’s gotten a functionality and some true benefits for health," plant biology professor Ilya Raskin told WCBS 880′s Levon Putney. Raskin broke down lettuce into individual cells, reproduced the cells high in antioxidants and there you go – super lettuce!

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Rutgers professor develops ‘superfood’ lettuce

Blueberries are considered the gold standard of "superfoods" because of their high levels of polyphenols, beneficial compounds shown to protect against diabetes, cardiovascular disease, memory loss, inflammation and cancer. However, this seasonal fruit, often priced at a premium, is high in sugar content, requiring limited consumption by people on restrictive diets…A new superfood that’s low in sugar and available year-round and exceeds the high polyphenol content of blueberries hits the market this month. This high-polyphenol lettuce has been named Rutgers Scarlet Lettuce (RSL) – a tribute to Rutgers’ school mascot and color, the Rutgers Scarlet Knights, and is the brainchild of Rutgers Distinguished Professor in Plant Biology Ilya Raskin.

Read the entire article at MyCentralJersey.com »