Frogs’ chorus leads to discovery of new species in US

Scientists have confirmed that a frog found living in New York City wetlands is a new species. Jeremy Feinberg, of Rutgers University in New Jersey, who led the study, first reported the discovery when he heard their "very odd" chorusing call. Teaming up with genetics experts to confirm the finding, Mr Feinberg has now published the discovery in the journal Plos One. It is the first new frog species found in the region for nearly 30 years. Mr Feinberg told BBC News he knew he might be on to something when he heard a group of them calling in chorus at a wetland study site on Staten Island.

Read the entire article at bbc.com »

Big City, Big Surprise: New York City’s Newest Species Is a Frog

Even in one of the most densely populated places on Earth, nature is still capable of some big surprises. Biologists have described a new species of leopard frog discovered in New York City. Only the second new frog species found in the continental United States in the past 30 years, it remained hidden in plain sight in a city of 8.4 million people. "It’s a pretty unique event," said Rutgers University ecologist Jeremy Feinberg, part of a group of researchers who made the discovery.

Read the entire article at news.nationalgrographic.com »

New Leopard Frog Found in New York City

There’s a newly discovered vocalist in the Big Apple with a sound unlike any other in the city. In 2008, Jeremy Feinberg, a graduate student at Rutgers University, was wading around in a wetland on Staten Island when he heard something strange. In a swampy patch less than 10 miles from the Statue of Liberty, he picked up on a peculiar chirp-chirp call that was distinct from the croaks of the known leopard frogs on the island. Investigating that song ultimately led Feinberg and his colleagues to a new species of leopard frog – the first amphibian discovered in New York since 1854, and the first found in the U.S. in three decades.

Read the entire article at smothsonianmag.com »

Study Suggests Harsh Winters Connected With Sea Ice Decline

A team of scientists have recently published a paper which discusses the link between extreme weather and the decline of Arctic Ice. In light of the human emissions-slash-global warming discussion, this study is very important. It has confirmed that cold winters throughout Europe and Asia are twice as common these days because of a decline in sea ice in a specific region of the Atlantic Ocean…"This is a very solid paper that supports the mechanism identified in other recent papers linking sea-ice loss in the area of the Arctic Ocean north of Scandinavia to persistently cold winter conditions in central Asia," stated Jennifer Francis, researcher at Rutgers University.

Read the entire article at dumb-out.net »

Here’s why GMO labeling initiatives might fail – again

Yesterday, the Oregonian released a new poll it had commissioned showing that Measure 92, a ballot initiative to require the labeling of foods containing genetically modified ingredients in the state, was trailing 48 to 42 percent among likely voters. Yet back in July, another poll conducted for Earthfix of Oregon, an environmentally focused branch of Oregon Public Broadcasting, put support for the initiative at a very impressive 77 percent…One 2013 survey conducted by researchers at Rutgers University found that 54 percent of Americans say they know "very little or nothing at all" about genetically modified foods, and 25 percent have never even heard of them. .."It’s really clear that people don’t know very much about the subject," says Rutgers’ William Hallman, lead researcher on the poll. "And when people don’t know much abut a subject, how you ask them a question about it largely determines the answer you get back."

Read the entire article at WashingtonPost.com »