The Lost Art of Home Cooking Restored, Kid Style

The Cooking, Learning and Eating event was an opportunity for parents to get their kids cooking. Back row, L - R: Doug Duda; Former White House executive pastry chef and Rutgers Alum Bill Yosses; Diana Rice and Orti Polak. Front row, L - R: President of ChopChop Kids Sally Sampson and junior chefs Ella and Sher. Photo by Roy Groething

The Cooking, Learning and Eating event was an opportunity for parents to get their kids cooking. Back row, L – R: Doug Duda; Former White House executive pastry chef and Rutgers Alum Bill Yosses; Diana Rice and Orti Polak. Front row, L – R: President of ChopChop Kids Sally Sampson and junior chefs Ella and Sher. Photo by Roy Groething

IFNH and ChopChop Magazine Host Former White House Chef in Cooking Demo for Kids

Give a kid a fishstick and he will eat for a day. Teach a kid how to cook and he will go home and show his parents. It is no secret that wrapped in the intricate problem of the rise in childhood obesity and obesity-related diseases, is the profile of food eaten at home. The bygone era of a household with a stay at home parent that prepared meals from scratch, transformed into busy working caregivers who rely on processed convenience and/or fast food to fill hungry bellies. Unfortunately, food on the run often contains more empty calories than nourishment, and the consequences of poor nutrition are reflected in the increasing rates of chronic disease.

The New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health (IFNH), ChopChop Magazine and former White House pastry chef Bill Yosses, now the Director of the ChopChop Cooking Lab, are out to change that dynamic. With this common goal, IFNH and ChopChop in 2014 became partners in working to create healthy lifestyles at an early age, and in December, sponsored their first joint venture, hosting Yosses, a Rutgers alumnus (GSNB’78), for a hands-on evening for children and families teaching children about food and cooking, with a blend of science and fun. “Kids: Cooking, Learning and Eating” was held in Trayes Hall at the Douglass Campus Center. [Read more…]

How Rutgers Scientists Transformed Lettuce into a “Superfood”

Ask someone to name a "superfood," a food item jam-packed with nutritional value, and a few items invariably come up. Blueberries. Quinoa. Almonds. Kale. Thanks to a team of Rutgers University scientists, you can add lettuce- yes, lettuce- to the list… The new lettuce has more antioxidants and polyphenols, which are associated with preventing cancer and cardiovascular disease, than blueberries. It’s packed with fiber and low in calories, the scientists say… Most important, it tastes good- at least to Rutgers Distinguished Prof. Ilya Raskin, who led the project to develop the super-lettuce.

Read the entire article at www.nj.com »

Are superfoods actually super?

First it was blueberries, spinach and salmon. Then it was wheatgrass, green tea and any kind of nut. Now it’s kale, quinoa and pumpkin seeds. Next week- who knows? If you’re confounded by the number of foods that have been named "superfoods" over the years, you’re not alone… The European Union took a definitive stance in 2007 when it banned use of the term "superfood" on packaging unless the claim could be supported by scientific evidence. The United States has no such ban, however, and while there’s general consensus as to what the word refers to — a food that’s rich in vitamins, antioxidants or other nutrients- it’s still "purely a marketing term," said Dr. Ilya Raskin, a professor at Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences.

Read the entire article at www.northjersey.com »

Rutgers Creates a Super Lettuce

Rutgers Distinguished Professor Ilya Raskin and a team of scientists from the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences developed this nutritious lettuce that is low in calories and high in fiber… In October, capping three years of development, Rutgers Scarlet Lettuce was picked up by Coastline Family Farms of Salinas, California. The company began distributing it throughout North and South America. Marketed and trademarked as Nutraleaf, the new super lettuce comes in two varieties, a leaf and a romaine. Both are available locally at various Wegman’s supermarkets

Read the entire article at www.njmonthly.com »

Let Us Eat food program fills a void in Atlantic County

A Community FoodBank of New Jersey truck pulled up outside the C.J. Davenport Elementary School Complex Wednesday, Dec. 17 to deliver 181 boxes of food for Egg Harbor Township families in need. The truck was greeted by school district personnel and Jim Cooper, founder of the nonprofit program Let Us Eat Please… The program includes an educational component through the New Jersey Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program headquartered in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences.

Read the entire article at www.shorenewstoday.com »