Finding A Cold-Hardy Peach Variety Is Not That Easy

Peach trees and cold temperatures don’t mix. Just ask growers in the Midwest and East as they are once again reeling from another brutal winter where sub-zero temperature left trees severely damaged… After suffering loses at the hands of Mother Nature, growers may seek to learn more about varieties that are deemed cold-hardy. However, the quest to find a cold-hardy peach is more difficult than you might expect. A variety that is known to be cold tolerant in one area may find the differing weather patterns in another region more difficult to adjust to, says Jerry Frecon, professor emeritus at Rutgers University… In the end, Frecon says regardless of varieties or cultural practices, carrying crop insurance may give a grower more piece of mind. However, it may not be offered in a particular area and some may view it as a waste of time… "The risks are so great and the weather so unpredictable in many areas of the U.S. That it is hard to fathom growing certain perennial crops like peaches," he says. "You will have a difficult task."

Read the entire article at www.growingproduce.com »

Too Much Vitamin B12 Linked to Acne

Too much vitamin B12 may promote acne, according to a new study… In the study, scientists investigated the differences between skin bacteria from people prone to acne and bacteria from people with clear-skinned faces. The researchers looked at the bacteria’s gene expression, hoping to figure out why Propionibacterium acnes, which is the most common skin microbe, causes pimples in some people but not in others… "The data and hypothesis are very intriguing, but much additional investigation is required to determine if this is a real cause-and-effect phenomenon," said Josh Miller, a professor of nutritional sciences at Rutgers University who was not involved with the study… In addition, although the new findings suggest that B12 supplements may promote inflammation, other studies have suggested the opposite- that vitamin B12 has anti-inflammatory properties, Miller said.

Read the entire article at www.livescience.com »

Wine Pairing 101: Matching Wine And Cheese

Peanut butter and jelly. Salt and pepper. Mac and cheese. There are too many classic food pairings to count. But there’s one combination that’s a step above the rest – wine and cheese. Nothing says luxury quite like a great bottle of vino and some perfectly aged cheese. Here’s what you need to know about pairing these two ingredients at your next party… There’s actually a scientific reason why wine and cheese taste so good when eaten together. Researchers from Rutgers University found that astringent foods such as wine and fatty ingredients like cheese strike a balance on our palates because they’re opposites on the sensory spectrum… "The mouth is a magnificently sensitive somatosensory organ, arguably the most sensitive in the body," said Paul Breslin of Rutgers University. "The way foods make our mouths feel has a great deal to do with what foods we choose to eat."

Read the entire article at www.sunriseseniorliving.com »

Farm Fresh At Your Table

Nowadays residents of North Hudson can hardly toss a tomato without hitting a farmers market. New markets have cropped up in Union City and North Bergen, joining existing ones in neighboring communities, and many people are taking advantage of the opportunity to purchase fresh, locally grown produce and other edibles… The WPA is also responsible for the new farmers market at Ellsworth Park in Union City… "Its takes place on the street at 24th and Palisade Avenue, not exactly in the park," said Breanna Robles, who manages both markets for the WPA. "The shoppers walk on the sidewalk and shop."… "When you look at the West Coast and New York City they usually have food trucks," said Robles, who is studying city planning at Rutgers University. "They’re becoming more integrated in the movement toward fresh food and produce."

Read the entire article at www.hudsonreporter.com »

Why is Your Cat Such a Picky Eater? Scientists Reveal Clues.

With names like Fancy Feast and Pedigree, it seems that, when it comes to feeding our feline friends, only the finest foods will do. But even if you open a can of Solid Gold, sometimes your cat will turn up her nose. Feeling defeated, you look around, can of meat-like substance in hand, wondering what went wrong… Cats are notoriously picky eaters, and veterinarians, nutritionists, and pet food makers are just a few of those interested in unraveling Felix’s fickle taste… For all animals, the sense of taste is a product of evolution, and "there’s a pretty good relationship between bitter things and toxins," says Paul Breslin of Rutgers University Department of Nutritional Sciences and Monell Chemical Senses Center.

Read the entire article at www.csmonitor.com »