Graduate Students Affiliated with Haskin Lab Score Scholarship “Trifecta”

Amanda Wenczel

Amanda Wenczel

Three Rutgers graduate students affiliated with the Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory, Amanda Wenczel, Jason Morson and Jenny Paterno, have each been awarded a George Burlew Scholarship Grant from the Manasquan River Marlin and Tuna Club to help support their marine science research. This grant was previously awarded to high school students and college students but today is only awarded to full- or part-time graduate students pursuing marine-related studies.

Jason Morson

Jason Morson

Wenczel’s research focuses on the study of the potential feeding interactions of native New Jersey shellfish while Paterno’s research interests are restoration ecology in aquatic systems and community science education. Morson’s research explores the application of targeted biological and ecological data to reduce uncertainty in fisheries stock assessment model parameters.

Jenny Paterno

Jenny Paterno

The George Burlew Scholarship Grant was first awarded in June 1979 in honor of Captain George Burlew, who was a member of the Manasquan River Marlin and Tuna Club and a pioneer of sport fishing on and out of the Manasquan River. Captain Burlew was a well-known fishing guide and a long-time owner of Burlew’s Anchorage in Manasquan.

 

Decline of Gulf of Maine cod leaves regulators a tough task

A regional fishery management council is preparing to take on the task of trying to reverse a nearly 99 percent decline in Maine’s cod fish catch that has stripped the state’s economy of more than $250 million over the past 22 years…Malin Pinsky, a member of the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, said in an email that many years of overfishing in the gulf have pushed cod to exceptionally low levels, and that global warming is likely exacerbating the problem because cod populations grow more slowly in warmer water. "This makes recovery a slow and difficult process, especially when fishing continues," Pinsky said.

Read the entire article at PressHerald.com »

Rutgers Haskin Lab Assists Cape May Co-op in Getting Oysters to Market

Fresh, tender Delaware Bay oysters from Cape May being shucked. Credit: Jack Rabin

Fresh, tender Delaware Bay oysters from Cape May being shucked. Credit: Jack Rabin

Lisa Calvo, aquaculture program coordinator at Rutgers Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory, has been a key resource in guiding the Cape May Oyster Cooperative, with additional help from experts at Rutgers New Jersey Aquaculture Innovation Center and the Rutgers Food Innovation Center. Read more from New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium on how working as a cooperative helps member oyster farms get their oysters to market.

Rutgers Haskin Lab Helps Celebrate Annual Bay Day in New Jersey

HSRL director Dave Bushek shares information at the lab’s exhibit booth with festival participant.

HSRL Director Dave Bushek shares information at the lab’s exhibit booth with a festival participant.

Delaware Bay Day, the free folklife festival celebrating the Bay and the Bayshore region, was held on June 7 in Bivalve, Port Norris and East Point, NJ. Hosted by the Bayshore Center, the festival which is dubbed “Food, Fun & Fireworks in Bivalve, NJ,” offered a number of fun activities and historical displays, including educational exhibits like the Rutgers Haskin Shellfish Laboratory. [Read more...]

The Fun and Sex of Shellfish Restoration

Wet, dirty sex – that’s the topic for discussion of an upcoming class. "It’s the sex talk," admitted Gef Flimlin, professor and marine extension agent of the Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Ocean County. "Now, the average guy is really interested because he sees those three letters: S, E, X." This class is the second for ReClam the Bay, the nonprofit organization that is affiliated with the Barnegat Bay Shellfish Restoration Program sponsored by Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Ocean County. The class will feature Flimlin discussing how spawning happens in the clam hatchery – the sex part. Flimlin said the class will go from spawning all the way to harvesting.

Read the entire article at TheSandpaper.VillageSoup.com »