Bill would simplify aquaculture permit process

Legislation to simplify the permit process for aquaculture projects such as oyster farms in state waters was approved Thursday by the Senate Economic Growth Committee… In 2013, Rutgers University released a survey of oyster farmers in New Jersey. There were 12 oyster farmers, and 11 of them responded. One respondent was located in Cumberland County, six in Cape May County, three in Ocean County and one in Atlantic County.

Read the entire article at The Press of Atlantic City »

Medical Labs May Be Killing Horseshoe Crabs

Drawing the crabs’ blue blood for vital medical testing can condemn the animals to die, even after they are returned to the sea… "There’s not very good science-based information on the mortality of the crabs. I’ve seen figures range from 15 percent to 40 percent but nobody has a really good handle on that," says Michael De Luca, senior associate director at the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University.

Read the entire article at Scientific American »

World’s richest source of oceanographic data now operational at Rutgers

The National Science Foundation awarded $11.8 million to Rutgers to launch and operate the Ocean Observatories Initiative’s data system. The data center for the pioneering Ocean Observatories Initiative, which collects and shares data from more than 800 sophisticated instruments and a transmission network across the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, is now operating at Rutgers University… "Rutgers is now the hub for the world’s richest source of new in-water oceanographic data, and we are extremely proud to have been chosen for this important work," says Christopher J. Molloy, Rutgers’ senior vice president for research and economic development.

Read the entire article at MyCentralJersey.com »

New England lobsters swim to Canada, bringing jobs with them

Warming waters from climate change off the Atlantic coast are driving lobsters further north than ever before, disrupting fisheries and – for some – perhaps changing a way of life forever… Malin Pinsky, an assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources at Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences in New Jersey, calls the northward movement of lobsters over the last five decades dramatic. In that period of time, the crustaceans has shifted more than 273 kilometres northward.

Read the entire article at National Observer »

Our Local Sharks Prefer Seafood

There are plenty of sharks living in the waters around Long Beach Island: in the bays, lagoons and even the surf. But except for the famous 1916 attacks off Beach Haven and in the Manasquan River, no other mortal shark attacks have been recorded in New Jersey… Rutgers University’s Institute of Marine and Coastal Science’s most eminent ichthyologist, Ken Able, Ph.D., is the long-time director of the Rutgers Marine Field Station, located at the end of Great Bay Boulevard in Little Egg Harbor. Able and his graduate students have been tallying the number and types of fishes in the waters off Great Bay and Little Egg Harbor since 1989.

Read the entire article at The Sandpaper »

Scientists create world’s largest coral gene database

Coral reefs…have survived five major extinction events over the last 250 million years. Now, an international team of scientists led by Rutgers faculty has conducted the world’s most comprehensive analysis of coral genes, focusing on how their evolution has allowed corals to interact with and adapt to the environment… "There are a few key genes in corals that allow them to build this house that laid down the foundation for many, many thousands of years of corals," said Debashish Bhattacharya, a professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers. "It couldn’t be any more fundamental to ocean ecosystems." (Also appeared in Science Daily, Science Codex, eScienceNews, ScienMag.com, Science Newsline.)

Read the entire article at Phys.org. »

Students Learn About Marine Science On Cape May Trip

You may not think of the life cycle of an oyster when you see the tasty mollusk on the menu, but East Windsor students recently got to learn not only about the science behind the shellfish, but also the history of the oyster trade and its impact on the Delaware Bay economy… "For a lot of kids, these experiences are eye-openers, even for our local students — they may not be aware of the Delaware Bay and its importance in the local economy and environment," said Jenny Paterno, Program Coordinator II of the Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory at Rutgers University.

Read the entire article at Hartford Courant »

N.J. decision ignites Shore strife: Oysters vs. red knots

A car door slammed on South Reeds Beach Road, and 300 feeding shorebirds – ruddy turnstones, sandpipers, and red knots – took wing, shrieking out over the Delaware Bay… "The U.S. Division of Fish and Wildlife has determined that these activities do not threaten the survival of the species," said David Bushek, director of Rutgers’ Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory in Port Norris. "There’s a bit of exaggeration about the dangers" of aquaculture, he said.

Read the entire article at Philly.com »

World’s richest source of oceanographic data now operational at Rutgers

The data center for the pioneering Ocean Observatories Initiative, which collects and shares data from more than 800 sophisticated instruments and a transmission network across the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, is now operating at Rutgers University… The OOI cyberinfrastructure team is led by Manish Parashar, distinguished professor of computer science and founding director of the Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute (RDI2), in collaboration with Scott Glenn and Oscar Schofield, distinguished professors of marine and coastal sciences and directors of the Rutgers University Center for Ocean "Our OOI partners have deployed advanced platforms and a wide variety of sensors in challenging environments at sea," Glenn said. "Enabling unprecedented access to scientists and educators through an equally advanced cyberinfrastructure is our goal. We are excited that Rutgers is part of the team."

Read the entire article at Phys.org »

Changing Migration Patterns Upend East Coast Fishing Industry

Summer flounder that once amassed in North Carolina have gradually shifted about 140 miles to New Jersey-one facet of the northward migration of fish species that is upending traditional fishing patterns… "Some fisherman will end up losing out and some will win big," said Malin Pinsky, an assistant professor of ecology and evolution at Rutgers University, who is part of a team of scientists from Rutgers, Princeton University and Yale University studying the phenomenon.

Read the entire article at The Wall Street Journal »