New Jersey scientist helps cracks genetic code, then gives it away

Ending hunger, conserving the environment and advancing medicine were more important goals to Rutgers Professor Joachim Messing than earning lots of cash. So when he discovered a way to crack the genetic code of humans and plants like rice, corn and wheat, Messing did not patent his work. Instead, he gave away the tools he invented – for free – to his fellow scientists around the world because he believed it was vital for future research.

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Rutgers Gardens Incorporates Student Farm for Outreach and Learning Opportunities

Raised beds prepared for student farm production at Rutgers Gardens.

Raised beds prepared for student farm production at Rutgers Gardens.

A student run farm that has operated at the Hort Farm since 1993 will re-emerge across the lane at Rutgers Gardens. The Office of Agriculture and Urban Programs will offer a sequence of interdisciplinary courses involving the organic farm. It also will provide the foundation for a broad spectrum of community outreach and programs, student research opportunities and entrepreneurial pursuits. Read more at Rutgers Today.

Unseasonably warm weather brings bounty to local farmers

With some days this month topping 70 degrees, it’s not feeling particularly seasonable. But the mild weather is helping local farmers extend their season. But it’s not all good news. Rick Van Vranken of Rutgers’ Cooperative Extension in Atlantic County, New Jersey, said fruit growers would prefer more typical temperatures.

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NJAES Center Provides Science and Expertise to Help NJ Winemakers Succeed

Cabernet franc grapes maturing at Bellview Vineyard, Atlantic County.

Cabernet franc grapes maturing at Bellview Vineyard, Atlantic County.

As more New Jersey farmers grow grapes for winemaking, Rutgers is playing a key role in that growth, providing the science and expertise to help them tap into an increasingly profitable agricultural sector in the state. Last year, the New Jersey Center for Wine Research and Education at Rutgers was launched to work in partnership with the industry to develop the best grape variety in the state. Read more at Rutgers Today.

Local Aspiring Equine Veterinarians Win Scholarships

Two young women from New Jersey were among the five equine veterinary students awarded this year’s prestigious Merck Animal Health/American Association of Equine Practitioners Foundation scholarship… The Merck Animal Health/AAEP Foundation scholarship program rewards second- and third-year veterinary students dedicated to equine medicine for their academic excellence, leadership in their school and AAEP student chapter, and their long-term goals. Elisabeth Leahy, studying at Michigan State University and Sarah Colmer, the at the University of Pennsylvania, are the recipients hailing from the Garden State… Leahy graduated from Rutgers University, where she majored in animal science/equine science and gained valuable equine nutrition research experience under Dr. Carey Williams. "While in college, I began working at the New Jersey Equine Clinic (NJEC), Millstone, cleaning stalls and operating the hyperbaric chamber on the weekends. When I graduated from Rutgers in 2010, I transitioned to full-time veterinary assistant at NJEC. I loved my job and I set out to learn everything I could, including anesthesia," said Leahy.

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