New Jersey Educator Donates Historic U.S. Soils Collection to National Agriculture Library

The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service formally transfers the 1916 U.S. soil collection and publication, “Important Soils of the United States” to the USDA National Agricultural Library for safekeeping and archival purposes in Beltsville, MD on Aug. 19, 2015. USDA photo by Anson Eaglin.

On Aug. 19, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service formally transferred the 1916 U.S. soil collection and publication, “Important Soils of the United States,” to the USDA National Agricultural Library for safekeeping and archival purposes in Beltsville, MD.

On Aug. 19, fifty people including staff from the University of Maryland, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), National Agriculture Library (NAL), members of the Mid-Atlantic Association of Professional Soil Scientists, Rutgers University, and the Firman E. Bear Soil and Water Conservation Society gathered at the NAL for a ceremony to convey a historic 1916 U.S. soils collection. The donor, Jill Guenther, a Vineland, NJ educator, donated a historic collection of U.S. soils to the Library where the collection will be archived for safekeeping, included in Library exhibits, and available upon request for onsite inspection. [Read more…]

US Trotting Body Backs Cobalt Study

The US Trotting Association is funding research to evaluate whether cobalt is a performance-enhancing substance. In doing so, it will assess its effects on red blood cell production… The fresh research will be carried out by Dr George Maylin, from Morrisville State College in New York, and Dr Karyn Malinowski and Dr Ken McKeever, both from Rutgers University in New Jersey… Testing will comprise measurements of maximal aerobic capacity and markers of performance, measurement of plasma volume and blood volume as well as lactate, erythropoietin (EPO), thyroid hormones and various blood hematological factors after dosing with cobalt.

Read the entire article at www.horsetalk.com »

Rutgers Researchers Working On Cobalt Study

The U.S. Trotting Association announced it will fund a research study by renowned equine researchers Dr. George Maylin from Morrisville State College in New York and Dr. Karyn Malinowski and Dr. Ken McKeever of Rutgers University in New Jersey to evaluate the effects of cobalt on red blood cell production (erythropoiesis) and performance enhancement in horses… "The purpose is to study the effects of cobalt on racehorses with the exercise physiology model used by Dr. McKeever to study drugs such as EPO," explained Dr. Maylin. "It’s the only way to assess the pharmacological effects with this type of compound. It will be a dose-response study to see if some level of cobalt has an effect on performance."… According to the study plan, 50 mg of cobalt (Co HCl in one liter of saline) will be administered at 9 a.m. on three consecutive days. Blood samples will be obtained before and at one, two, four and 24 hours after administration.

Read the entire article at www.sboanj.com »

Rutgers-bred Dogwood Hybrids Formally Named After Legendary Breeder Elwin Orton and Rutgers University

Cornus × elwinortonii 'Venus.' Photo: Tom Molnar.

Cornus × elwinortonii ‘Venus.’ Photo: Tom Molnar.

Finally, two hybrid species of flowering dogwood developed by renowned Rutgers breeder Elwin Orton have been formally named after him and Rutgers University, which supported his prolific breeding career that spanned almost 50 years.

The two Rutgers dogwood hybrids, Cornus × elwinortonii and Cornus × rutgersensis, were developed by Orton decades ago and have finally been provided with scientific names in a paper published in the open-access journal, PhytoKeys, for horticulturists and garden lovers worldwide to add to their lexicon.

Cornus × rutgersensis 'Stellar Pink.' Photo: Tom Molnar.

Cornus × rutgersensis ‘Stellar Pink.’ Photo: Tom Molnar.

The formal announcement of the new scientific names for the now commonly grown hybrids across the United States, Europe and Japan was made by Robert Mattera, plant biology student in the Rutgers Graduate School–New Brunswick and USAID research and innovation fellow of the Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs at Rutgers; Tom Molnar, geneticist and associate professor in the Department of Plant Biology and Pathology; and Lena Struwe, botanist and associate professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources and the Department of Plant Biology and Pathology.

Orton, professor emeritus of plant biology and pathology and well-known breeder of woody ornamentals, was inducted into the New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame in 2012. To date, he’s earned more than 15 patents for new cultivars of dogwoods and holly he developed, earning the university over $2.03 million in cumulative royalties.

Read more of the announcement here.

Stand Tall to Beat Anthracnose

New Rutgers research shows taller height of cut with the right fertility and topdressing program gives turf a stronger chance to reduce summer stress and fight anthracnose… Dr. Bruce Clarke, Director of the Center for Turfgrass Science at Rutgers University, has been a part of a research group at Rutgers focused on anthracnose. The results from the 14-year long research project reveal how anthracnose can be thwarted through better management practices… "The project we are finishing up on started in 2001 when the disease was running rapidly on golf courses. We started as a research project and in 2005 expanded to a universal research project within 11 universities. Including one in Guelph, Canada. Right now we are focusing on putting together results from previous research about the best program for superintendents…" said Clarke.

Read the entire article at www.golfcourseindustry.com »