Better Tasting Strawberry Developed at Rutgers Makes Its Debut

99-204-01 Snyder trial May 31 2013_-9It’s been ten years in the making, but the team that has launched the Rutgers Scarlet Strawberry (RSS) knows they have a winner. Coming from retired plant biology professor Gojko Jelenkovic’s 20 years of testing hundreds of varieties to develop a better tasting strawberry, the RSS is the first of several new varieties that are coming to market after several years of field trials on New Jersey farms conducted by Agricultural Agents Pete Nitzsche and Bill Hlubik. Read more at Rutgers Today.

What Was the Key to Rutgers’ Lord Nelson’s Longevity?

What accounted for Lord Nelson’s extraordinary longevity? The world-renowned equine personality, professor and former mounted patrol horse, Lord Nelson died on April 12 at age 42… It’s more than making it to the age of 42- until recently, he was in phenomenal shape for an ancient equine… Dr. Karyn Malinowski, director of Rutgers Equine Science Center who has been responsible for Lord Nelson for the past 37.5 years, gave a lot of credit to his good genes. He was an unregistered quarter horse originally from Oklahoma, and she has no idea of his actual breeding. Besides genetics, Malinowski credits Lord Nelson’s long life to his temperament, management and the fact that he did not completely retire until a few years ago. Lord Nelson was "loyal, fearless and full of attitude," said Malinowski. "He was bold. He did it his way."… Although Malinowksi has dealt with many geriatric horses- both personally and professionally- she’s never known a horse to reach the Lord Nelson’s age.

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New Jersey Aquaculture Innovation Center Plays Important Role in Oyster Industry [VIDEO]

Oysters are a popular dinner choice near the shore. But before they end up on your plate, and in your stomach, they’re spawned at the New Jersey Aquaculture Innovation Center in Cape May… "Most of the oysters, local oysters that you would buy at a restaurant at any of the Delaware Bay counties, primarily were spawned and started in this facility," said Sean Towers, of Rutgers NJ Aquaculture Innovation Center… The Center, powered by Rutgers University, does more than selling oysters to local farmers. They’re putting an oyster blueprint together, so others can follow… Right now, the emphasis, is oysters. And algae, the oysters’ diet. But once the oyster blueprint is complete, the focus can shift elsewhere.

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Solving the Mystery of Rutgers’ Penalized Horse: Who Should be Saddled With Guilt?

On Wednesday, we brought you the sad news about longtime Rutgers police horse Lord Nelson, who passed away decades after being called for a penalty in a Rutgers-Army game in 1994. But Kevin MacConnell, the former Rutgers associate athletic director for marketing and communications, is "99 percent" sure Lord Nelson wasn’t the equine on the field that day. He says it was a horse from Medieval Times, the theme restaurant that includes jousting tournaments in Lyndhurst… Karyn Malinowski, a professor at the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences animal department, sticks by the story that it was Lord Nelson who was penalized that day. She’s the same person who purchased the horse for Rutgers in 1978 and who later owned him after he retired in 2000. "It was absolutely Lord Nelson," she said on Friday. "Because I remember seeing the news in The Star-Ledger the next day, that I was very mad at Coach [Doug] Graber’s statements because it wasn’t Lord Nelson’s fault. The rider, somebody asked him to go out on to the field. He didn’t just bolt out on to the field."

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Lord Nelson, a Rutgers Horse, Dies

Lord Nelson, the only horse to be penalized in a college football game, died. Rutgers University said Lord Nelson was 42. One of his duties during his 37-year Rutgers career was carrying the university’s Scarlet Knight mascot during football games. Against Army, in 1994, Lord Nelson was penalized for unsportsmanlike conduct after he broke free and raced down the sideline at Giants Stadium.

Read the entire article at www.nytimes.com »