Shoppers Buy More Healthy Foods With Store Audio Tour

Listening to nutrition podcasts while navigating grocery store aisles increases the likelihood of consumers making healthier choices, suggests a small but intriguing pilot study…From January to May 2011, researchers at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., recruited 56 shoppers, 44 women and 12 men age 41 years old on average, at a supermarket in the township of Woodbridge. The subjects listened to a five-minute podcast on an MP3 player that directed them to omega-3 foods in the store. The podcast stressed the importance of consuming seafood, nuts, seeds and vegetable oils – main dietary sources of omega-3s.

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Helping to Preserve New Jersey’s Raritan River

James Loring and Gretchen Wittenborn Johnson have a dream to clean up New Jersey’s Raritan River. To that end, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are endowing a new chair position in water resources and watershed ecology at Rutgers University in the department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources at the university’s School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. Endowing the position was a way to knit together several interests of Mr. and Mrs. Johnson that focus on the restoration and preservation of the river. Part of that stewardship, they say, is a greater focus on the relationship between the land and water in and around the Raritan.

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People Who Taste Too Much

There is a good reason why kale evokes such strong feelings in different people. What is harshly bitter to some 25% of the world – often classified as "supertasters" – is barely bitter to about another third. The rest of us fall somewhere in between. Such stark differences in how we perceive taste are programmed into our DNA…Beverly Tepper, a professor of food science at Rutgers University, in New Brunswick, N.J., found in a study that women who don’t taste PROP tend to be heavier than those who are supertasters.

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Map Plots Rising Seas Street by Jersey Street

While superstorm Sandy revealed the Northeast’s vulnerability, a new map by New Jersey scientists suggests how rising seas could make future storms even worse…”We are not trying to unduly frighten people,” said Rick Lathrop, director of the Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis at Rutgers, who led the map’s development. “This is providing people a look at where our vulnerability is.”

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Planting Seeds for a Better Oyster Harvest

New Jersey was once home to a booming oyster industry, as evidenced by the Victorian mansions along Cape May erected by fishing barons and coastal communities such as Bivalve and Shell Pile that took their names from the plentiful natural resource lining Delaware Bay…In some ways, the most recent push for New Jersey oysters can be dated to the early 1990s, when the industry was struck by the parasitic shellfish disease known as Dermo, which didn’t affect humans. "It was a crisis point. The industry was going to collapse," said David Bushek, director of Rutgers University’s Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory, in Port Norris, N.J.

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