Delaware Estuary Summit Charts Course for Aquaculture in the Region

Farm-raised oysters in New Jersey ready for market.

Farm-raised oysters in New Jersey ready for market. Photo by Lisa Calvo.

Managers, educators, and oyster farmers gathered at Cape May’s Grand Hotel late last month for a special session, “Shellfish Culture Now and Tomorrow: Charting a Course for Delaware Estuary Aquaculture,” held in conjunction with the Delaware Estuary Science and Environmental Summit. The Partnership for the Delaware Estuary has hosted the summit every two years since 2005 and it has become as important conference for a variety of stakeholders whose work focuses on the estuary.

The special session about shellfish aquaculture originated with Daphne Munroe, assistant professor at the Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory (HSRL). Munroe worked with summit organizers and HSRL colleague Lisa Calvo, aquaculture program coordinator, to develop and host the session, which included overviews of shellfish aquaculture in New Jersey and Delaware and an extensive discussion period that engaged conference participates and invited panelists. [Read more…]

Rutgers-led Study Shows That Even A “Small” Nuclear War Could Produce A Global Food Crisis

Castle Romeo nuclear test, Bikini Atoll 1954

Castle Romeo nuclear test, Bikini Atoll 1954

In a paper published Feb. 6 in the new American Geophysical Union journal Earth’s Future, Rutgers postdoc Lili Xia, Rutgers professor Alan Robock, National Center for Atmospheric Research scientist Michael Mills and colleagues demonstrate how crops in China, the largest grain producer in the world, would respond to the climate changes following a “small” regional nuclear war—using much less than 1 percent of the current global nuclear arsenal—between India and Pakistan.

According to the scientists, such a war could produce so much smoke from the fires ignited by attacks on cities and industrial areas that the smoke would be blown around the world, leading to cold, dark and dry conditions on the ground for more than a decade and producing the largest climate shift in recorded human history.

Using a crop simulation model, the researchers found that in China, in the first year after such a regional nuclear war, a cooler, drier, and darker environment would reduce annual corn production by 20 percent, rice production by 30 percent, and wheat production by 50 percent. These impacts would last for more than a decade, albeit at a gradually decreasing rate, so that even six to10 years after the war, rice production would be down 20 percent and wheat production down 25 percent. [Read more…]

Rutgers Research on Nature in Cities Featured in National Magazine

Myla Aronson at an urban field site on the Rahway River, NJ.

Myla Aronson at an urban field site on the Rahway River, NJ.

Myla Aronson (GSNB ‘07 Ph.D.), research scientist in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, has conducted far-reaching research that shows cities are not concrete jungles but instead harbor a variety of native birds and plants. Her work supports the argument that planning greenspaces in cities with biodiversity in mind benefits both people and nature. Read more about Aronson’s groundbreaking study of biodiversity in cities across the globe in National Wildlife magazine.

Celebrating 100 Years: Karl Maramorosch

The following is a tribute to Karl Maramorosch, Robert L. Starkey emeritus professor in the Department of Entomology of the Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, by Executive Dean Bob Goodman on the occasion of Maramorosch’s 100th birthday on January 16, 2015.

Bob Goodman, right, chats with Karl at the 2011 Retired Faculty Luncheon.

Bob Goodman, right, chats with Karl Maramorosch at the 2011 Retired Faculty Luncheon.

Few of us will be fortunate enough to pass the century mark in our lives, not to mention reaching 100 years of age and still being an active, productive scholar, lecturer, world traveler and mentor. For Karl Maramorosch, that fortunate milestone is just a small piece of what he would call a very lucky life, indeed.

Among the countless prizes and honors Karl has received during his career, he understandably is proudest of the Wolf Prize in Agriculture, bestowed upon him in 1980 by the Wolf Foundation in Israel. This honor is widely considered the Nobel Prize of agriculture, and Karl was cited “for his pioneering and wide-ranging studies on interactions between insects and disease agents in plants.”

Karl’s Wikipedia profile describes him as a virologist, entomologist and plant pathologist. That doesn’t begin to sketch a life that easily could have become a major motion picture. To get an idea of this remarkable man, one needs only to read Karl’s memoir. Here are some of the revelations:

“When the suggestion was made to write my biographical chapter for Advances in Virus Research, I did not know how difficult a task that would be – where to start, what to say, what to omit? I decided to start with my childhood and describe events in my life that inspired me to become a virologist and that were responsible for my scientific career.” [Read more…]

Reflections of Rutgers LA Students on Impact of National ASLA Conference

Rutgers students at the State Capitol. Front Row, L-R: Shaun Thomson, Alyssa Vianni, Josh Rodriguez, Theresa Hyslop, Teddy Aretakis, Amber Betances, Danny Rodriguez, Sandra Grosso, Arturo Hernandez   Back Row, L-R: John Jacobs, Sarah Korapati, Austin Scott, Mark Lacey, Scott Miller, James Cocorles, Eugene Fernandez, Christie Saliba, Grace Kinney, Brian Maher, Jacob DeBoer.

Rutgers ASLA Student Chapter members on the steps of the State Capitol in Denver, CO.
Front Row, L-R: Shaun Thomson, Alyssa Vianni, Josh Rodriguez, Theresa Hyslop, Teddy Aretakis, Amber Betances, Danny Rodriguez, Sandra Grosso and Arturo Hernandez.
Back Row, L-R: John Jacobs, Sarah Korapati, Austin Scott, Mark Lacey, Scott Miller, James Cocorles, Eugene Fernandez, Christie Saliba, Grace Kinney, Brian Maher and Jacob DeBoer. Photo: Ellen Gallagher.

Submitted by Ellen Gallagher, president of the Rutgers Student Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architecture, who also attended the national ASLA conference.

Members of the Rutgers Student Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architecture (ASLA) went to the National ASLA convention in Denver, Colorado, late last year and for many of us, it was our first time going out West. As students of landscape architecture, we learn about places and space but there is really no comparison to experiencing space. Flying in from New Jersey, the landscape changed drastically. The earth seemed as if it was endless, interrupted only by the eruption of the Rocky Mountains out of the flat land. We were enthralled.

Maybe it was the altitude, or maybe it was the excitement buzzing around us at the idea of being among some of the top landscape architects in the country, but all twenty of us could not wait to arrive at the convention center. While each of us took away different tokens of memory, one lecture resounded in all of our minds. The keynote speech by Dr. Robert Bullard about Environmental Justice related to all of us and left us talking about it afterwards. [Read more…]