Rutgers Oyster Researchers Rank Amongst the World’s Most Productive

Ximing Guo supervises students learning to extract DNA from oysters in his lab.

Ximing Guo supervises students learning to extract DNA from oysters in his lab at the Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory in Bivalve, NJ.

The scholarly excellence and vast collaborative network fostered by the oyster researchers at Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory (HSRL) in Bivalve, NJ, has propelled Rutgers to number three among the top 10 most productive oyster research institutions in the world. Its high ranking was further confirmed in a recent paper published in Aquaculture International, whose authors analyzed primary literature published on oysters over the past 23 years and found that Rutgers researchers get top honors among the global community of 23,414 authors studying oysters.

The literature analysis ranked faculty at the Haskin lab at the top in terms of oyster research globally, with senior faculty Ximing Guo, shellfish geneticist, and Dave Bushek, director of the Haskin laboratory, among the top 20 most productive authors. Guo, who shared the 2013 “Inventor of the Year” Award from the New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame and holds several U.S. and international patents in shellfish genetics, missed the top ranking by only two publications. [Read more…]

Interactive Forensics Training Helps Professionals Solve Petroleum Contamination Cases

Environmental Forensics course teaches the most up-to-date techniques to employ in the field.

Environmental Forensics course teaches the most up-to-date techniques to employ in the field.

When a site is contaminated with petroleum products, there are many questions. How did it happen? When did it happen? And, most importantly, who is responsible for paying to clean it up?

This fall, Rutgers University’s Office of Continuing Professional Education (OCPE) will help professionals answer those questions in its completely revamped Environmental Forensics training course.

Designed for environmental consultants, attorneys, hazardous material emergency responders and professionals in related fields, the two-day class, Sept. 9–10, will reveal the science behind the environmental forensics of petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbon geochemistry. Students will also learn about new trends in professional investigations. [Read more…]

Rutgers-bred Dogwood Hybrids Formally Named After Legendary Breeder Elwin Orton and Rutgers University

Cornus × elwinortonii 'Venus.' Photo: Tom Molnar.

Cornus × elwinortonii ‘Venus.’ Photo: Tom Molnar.

Finally, two hybrid species of flowering dogwood developed by renowned Rutgers breeder Elwin Orton have been formally named after him and Rutgers University, which supported his prolific breeding career that spanned almost 50 years.

The two Rutgers dogwood hybrids, Cornus × elwinortonii and Cornus × rutgersensis, were developed by Orton decades ago and have finally been provided with scientific names in a paper published in the open-access journal, PhytoKeys, for horticulturists and garden lovers worldwide to add to their lexicon.

Cornus × rutgersensis 'Stellar Pink.' Photo: Tom Molnar.

Cornus × rutgersensis ‘Stellar Pink.’ Photo: Tom Molnar.

The formal announcement of the new scientific names for the now commonly grown hybrids across the United States, Europe and Japan was made by Robert Mattera, plant biology student in the Rutgers Graduate School–New Brunswick and USAID research and innovation fellow of the Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs at Rutgers; Tom Molnar, geneticist and associate professor in the Department of Plant Biology and Pathology; and Lena Struwe, botanist and associate professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources and the Department of Plant Biology and Pathology.

Orton, professor emeritus of plant biology and pathology and well-known breeder of woody ornamentals, was inducted into the New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame in 2012. To date, he’s earned more than 15 patents for new cultivars of dogwoods and holly he developed, earning the university over $2.03 million in cumulative royalties.

Read more of the announcement here.

Jenny Carleo, ARMA Agent for Cape May County, Earns Distinguished Service Award

Mike Hogan, 2015 President of the National Association of County Agricultural Agents, presents the Distinguished Service Award to Jenny Carleo. Photo: Kevin Blayney.

Mike Hogan, 2015 President of the National Association of County Agricultural Agents, presents the Distinguished Service Award to Jenny Carleo. Photo: Kevin Blayney.

Jenny Carleo (CC ’99, GSNB ’03), agricultural and resource management agent for Rutgers NJAES Cooperative Extension of Cape May County, was recognized with the 2015 Distinguished Service Award by the National Association of County Agricultural Agents. The award honors members with at least 10 years of outstanding service to Cooperative Extension, who have been active in professional development, have an effective extension program and are endorsed by their state membership and state extension director.

[Read more…]

SEBS Nutritional Sciences Lab Hosts STEP-UP and RiSE Fellows

This summer, two undergraduates from outside of Rutgers came together in the lab of Tracy Anthony, associate professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences, for intense hands-on summer research experiences that will help shape their futures in science.

Prof. Tracy Anthony, center, meets in the conference room with summer fellows and post docs conducting research in her lab. L-R: Post-doc Inna Nikonorova, STEP-UP Fellow Erica Steele, Tracy Anthony, RiSE Fellow Kilus Feleke and Post-doc Ashley Pettit.

Prof. Tracy Anthony, center, meets in the conference room with summer fellows and post docs conducting research in her lab. L-R: Post-doc Inna Nikonorova, STEP-UP Fellow Erica Steele, Tracy Anthony, RiSE Fellow Kilus Feleke and Post-doc Ashley Pettit.

Erica Steele, a rising senor from Rochester Institute of Technology in New York, was a fellow in the American Physiological Society’s Short-Term Education Program for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP) program while Kidus Feleke, a rising senior at Jackson State University in Mississippi, was a fellow in the Research in Science and Engineering (RiSE) program funded by Rutgers.

Both Kidus and Erica spent the summer conducting research in the Anthony lab under the auspices of programs that are both designed to provide greater access to undergraduate students nationwide from disadvantaged backgrounds and underrepresented groups.

This is the first year that Anthony has been involved with the STEP-UP program, which is supported by a grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), but it’s her third year participating as an established scientist in the RiSE program, which is supported by Rutgers.

Both programs “do a fantastic job facilitating the development of young experimental scientists,” explained Anthony. [Read more…]