Celebrating 100 Years: Karl Maramorosch

The following is a tribute to Karl Maramorosch, Robert L. Starkey emeritus professor in the Department of Entomology of the Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, by Executive Dean Bob Goodman on the occasion of Maramorosch’s 100th birthday on January 16, 2015.

Bob Goodman, right, chats with Karl at the 2011 Retired Faculty Luncheon.

Bob Goodman, right, chats with Karl Maramorosch at the 2011 Retired Faculty Luncheon.

Few of us will be fortunate enough to pass the century mark in our lives, not to mention reaching 100 years of age and still being an active, productive scholar, lecturer, world traveler and mentor. For Karl Maramorosch, that fortunate milestone is just a small piece of what he would call a very lucky life, indeed.

Among the countless prizes and honors Karl has received during his career, he understandably is proudest of the Wolf Prize in Agriculture, bestowed upon him in 1980 by the Wolf Foundation in Israel. This honor is widely considered the Nobel Prize of agriculture, and Karl was cited “for his pioneering and wide-ranging studies on interactions between insects and disease agents in plants.”

Karl’s Wikipedia profile describes him as a virologist, entomologist and plant pathologist. That doesn’t begin to sketch a life that easily could have become a major motion picture. To get an idea of this remarkable man, one needs only to read Karl’s memoir. Here are some of the revelations:

“When the suggestion was made to write my biographical chapter for Advances in Virus Research, I did not know how difficult a task that would be – where to start, what to say, what to omit? I decided to start with my childhood and describe events in my life that inspired me to become a virologist and that were responsible for my scientific career.” [Read more…]

Reflections of Rutgers LA Students on Impact of National ASLA Conference

Rutgers students at the State Capitol. Front Row, L-R: Shaun Thomson, Alyssa Vianni, Josh Rodriguez, Theresa Hyslop, Teddy Aretakis, Amber Betances, Danny Rodriguez, Sandra Grosso, Arturo Hernandez   Back Row, L-R: John Jacobs, Sarah Korapati, Austin Scott, Mark Lacey, Scott Miller, James Cocorles, Eugene Fernandez, Christie Saliba, Grace Kinney, Brian Maher, Jacob DeBoer.

Rutgers ASLA Student Chapter members on the steps of the State Capitol in Denver, CO.
Front Row, L-R: Shaun Thomson, Alyssa Vianni, Josh Rodriguez, Theresa Hyslop, Teddy Aretakis, Amber Betances, Danny Rodriguez, Sandra Grosso and Arturo Hernandez.
Back Row, L-R: John Jacobs, Sarah Korapati, Austin Scott, Mark Lacey, Scott Miller, James Cocorles, Eugene Fernandez, Christie Saliba, Grace Kinney, Brian Maher and Jacob DeBoer. Photo: Ellen Gallagher.

Submitted by Ellen Gallagher, president of the Rutgers Student Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architecture, who also attended the national ASLA conference.

Members of the Rutgers Student Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architecture (ASLA) went to the National ASLA convention in Denver, Colorado, late last year and for many of us, it was our first time going out West. As students of landscape architecture, we learn about places and space but there is really no comparison to experiencing space. Flying in from New Jersey, the landscape changed drastically. The earth seemed as if it was endless, interrupted only by the eruption of the Rocky Mountains out of the flat land. We were enthralled.

Maybe it was the altitude, or maybe it was the excitement buzzing around us at the idea of being among some of the top landscape architects in the country, but all twenty of us could not wait to arrive at the convention center. While each of us took away different tokens of memory, one lecture resounded in all of our minds. The keynote speech by Dr. Robert Bullard about Environmental Justice related to all of us and left us talking about it afterwards. [Read more…]

Animal Sciences Professor Tapped for New Top-Tier International Advisory Board

Professor Kenneth McKeever.

Professor Kenneth McKeever.

Kenneth H. McKeever, professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at Rutgers University and associate director for research at the Rutgers Equine Science Center, was recently appointed to the Association of Racing Commissioners International’s (RCI) new Scientific Advisory Board. The RCI is the preeminent international body of regulators, scientists, and others involved in the oversight of equine and canine racing. Its mission is to advise national and international regulatory bodies so as to achieve consensus on policy issues including those focused on improving the integrity of the industry. The newly formed board is charged with developing recommendations for the anti-doping programs conducted in the international racing community.

The formation of this top-tier advisory board was prompted by numerous factors, including functional concerns about the current scientific advisory process, transparency, non-participation of key experts, and the recent withdrawal of the United States Trotting Association from the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium. [Read more…]

Ben Horton Presented the 2014 AGU Ocean Sciences Voyager Award

Ben Horton receiving the 2014 Ocean Voyager Award at the AGU annual meeting in December.

Ben Horton receiving the 2014 Ocean Sciences Voyager Award at the AGU annual meeting in December.

Ben Horton, professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, received the 2014 Ocean Sciences Voyager Award from the American Geophysical Union (AGU) last month. The award is given to mid-career scientists in recognition of significant contributions and expanding leadership in ocean sciences.

Horton’s research focuses on the mechanisms and nature of past sea-level changes, including those associated with earthquakes, tsunamis and storms, with the goal of understanding how these processes will impact future coastal environments.

Horton has rapidly distinguished himself as a leader both within and beyond his discipline.

Andrea Dutton, professor in Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Florida,
said in her citation for the award, “Certainly, the impact and quality of Ben’s publication record alone qualifies him for the Voyager Award. Beyond the high quality and sheer number of his scholarly contributions, Ben exemplifies many additional qualities that speak to his promise for continued leadership in ocean sciences, including his talent as an educator—both within academia and beyond—and as a leader in interdisciplinary science teams.” [Read more…]

Vorsa Named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors for his Pioneering Work with Cranberries

Nick Vorsa.

Nick Vorsa.

Nicholi Vorsa (CC ’76, GSNB ’84-Horticulture), research professor and developer of high-yielding cranberry varieties with enhanced fruit chemistry attributes, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Vorsa is also the director of Rutgers’ Marucci Blueberry and Cranberry Research and Extension Center.

The academy, which was founded four years ago, announced its 2014 fellows on December 16. Included among all of the NAI Fellows are 61 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, as well as 21 Nobel Laureates.

“Because his work has helped New Jersey’s cranberry growers for years, in a profound way, Professor Vorsa has made valuable contributions to a vital part of our state’s economy,” said Christopher J. Molloy, senior vice president for research and economic development at Rutgers. “We are pleased that he is receiving such prestigious national recognition for his accomplishments as an inventor.” [Read more…]