New Jersey scientist helps cracks genetic code, then gives it away

Ending hunger, conserving the environment and advancing medicine were more important goals to Rutgers Professor Joachim Messing than earning lots of cash. So when he discovered a way to crack the genetic code of humans and plants like rice, corn and wheat, Messing did not patent his work. Instead, he gave away the tools he invented – for free – to his fellow scientists around the world because he believed it was vital for future research.

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Where did January rank in N.J. snow history?

Before the big blizzard of 2016 struck, New Jersey was on the verge of having one of its least snowy Januarys on record. All it took was one big snowstorm to reverse that scenario. January 2016 turned out to be the fifth snowiest January by inch-count in the Garden State, according to records compiled by the office of New Jersey State Climatologist David Robinson at Rutgers University.

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Zika virus could reach N.J. by July

So long as it’s cold out, New Jersey has no need to worry about the Zika virus spreading here. But once the weather changes, the Zika virus could become a problem here, said Dina Fonseca, an entomologist and director of the Invasive and Emerging Disease Vectors Laboratory at Rutgers University.

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Gloucester County student wins Rutgers’ Bell Scholarship

Alyssa Lehman, 21, Williamstown, a senior at Rutgers University, received the Ernest Bell scholarship. The recipient must be a New Jersey resident and demonstrate a high level of scholastic achievement, involvement with New Jersey’s horse industry, and financial need.

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New Brunswick smashes old snowfall record

The powerful East Coast blizzard this past weekend turned out to be the biggest snowstorm on record in the city of New Brunswick, which was pounded with 26.9 inches of snow from Friday night to Saturday night. That snowfall total smashed the city’s previous record by more than 4 inches and also gave New Brunswick more snow than it usually gets in an entire year – 26.7 inches, according to New Jersey State Climatologist David Robinson, at Rutgers University.

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