Climate change driving fish north, Rutgers research shows

What fishermen have seen for years has now been confirmed- and mapped – by a group of Rutgers researchers, that warmer ocean waters have caused fish to seek their ideal temperatures farther north… Last week, the Rutgers team released data and charts to the public showing more than 60 species and how they migrated over the last 40 years. The average drift northward is 0.7 of a degree latitude, and 15 meters deeper in the water, Pinsky’s work found. "We’re seeing a trend of many species shifting northward and shifting deeper," said Malin Pinsky, a marine biologist leading the Rutgers team. "It is a sea change – and it affects fisheries quite a bit."

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Rutgers Master Gardeners complete two-year project at Old Broad Street Cemetery

Rutgers Master Gardeners of Cumberland County completed a two-year project planting 500 Ice Folly daffodils throughout the Old Broad Street Cemetery in Bridgeton. What a glorious display awaits us this spring. In addition, five trees, four shrubs and 30 daylilies were planted. Master Gardener Jane Hankins heads the Broad Street Cemetery Project, and she is presently preparing the paperwork for a grant to plant colorful shrubs throughout this historic cemetery.

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10 facts you may not know about N.J. cranberries

Last week we looked at the cranberry. New Jersey is the third largest producer of this Thanksgiving favorite in the United States..A "Scarlet Knight" variety of cranberry, released in 2012 by Nicholi Vorsa, director of Rutgers’ Philip E. Marucci Center for Blueberry and Cranberry Research in Chatsworth, is named after the Rutgers teams and its table-ready, dark "night" color. Unlike most cranberries, this variety is intended for the fresh fruit market and table displays, so it’s larger, has a more pleasing hue, a longer shelf-life and a more uniform shape.

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The case for the cranberry, New Jersey’s native Thanksgiving fruit

Pumpkin spice lattes, pumpkin pies, pumpkin picking. Given the preeminence of the orange squash and the number of products using its name, it’d be easy to think there’s no other fall flavor. Yet what about the pride of the Pine Barrens – that tart, ruby bauble known as the cranberry?…Enter Nicholi Vorsa, a scientist who’s worked with New Jersey’s cranberry crop since 1985. Director of Rutgers University’s Philip E. Marucci Center for Blueberry and Cranberry Research in Chatsworth, at the heart of cranberry country, he’s working on a way to make cranberries less tart, potentially allowing for the addition of less sugar.

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Master Gardeners visit Little Sprouts Early Learning Center

A group of Master Gardeners under the leadership of Claudia Kunath recently continued their education program at the Little Sprouts Early Learning Center with a presentation about the season of autumn. "Our goal with this presentation was to focus on the season of fall and what happens to trees and seeds," explained Claudia Kunath, the Team Leader for the Master Gardeners for Little Sprouts. The group staged a story complete with puppets and props, and then set up stations for crafts and further examination of seeds and fall foliage.

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