Roger Barr, Retired Bergen County 4-H Agent, Inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame

Barr receiving his award from (l-r) Pam Van Horn, president NAE4-HA; Christina Alford, executive vice president, National 4-H Council; and Lisa Lauxman, director, Division of Youth and 4-H, Institute of Youth, Family and Community, NIFA, USDA.

Roger Barr receives his award from (l-r) Pam Van Horn, president NAE4-HA; Christina Alford, executive vice president, National 4-H Council; and Lisa Lauxman, director, Division of Youth and 4-H, Institute of Youth, Family and Community, NIFA, USDA.

Roger Barr of Upper Saddle River, NJ, was inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame on October 10 for his lifetime achievements and contributions to 4-H. The former Bergen County agent was honored by the New Jersey 4-H Youth Development Program of Rutgers Cooperative Extension and was one of 14 people inducted during the ceremony at the National 4-H Youth Conference Center in Chevy Chase, MD.

The National 4-H Hall of Fame honorees are nominated by their home states, National 4-H Council, the National Association of Extension 4-H Agents or 4-H National Headquarters based upon their exceptional leadership at the local, state, national and international levels.

The honorees were presented with National 4-H Hall of Fame medallion, plaque and memory book during the ceremony. The National 4-H Hall of Fame was established in 2002 as part of the Centennial Project of the NAE4-HA in partnership with National 4-H Council and National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA. For more information about the National 4-H Hall of Fame event and past recipients, visit www.nae4ha.com/hof. [Read more...]

New Jersey’s Creeping Crisis in Water Infrastructure

stormwateroutfall_3New Jersey has an enviable system of water supply, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure. However, the State has historically under-invested in maintaining these systems and has not upgraded many antiquated components to modern standards. Associate Research Professor for Water, Society & the Environment Daniel Van Abs and his research team have completed recent reports on these issues for Together North Jersey (a regional cooperative planning project managed by Rutgers) and New Jersey Future (a statewide non-profit dedicated to improved local, regional and statewide planning). Van Abs presented an overview of the issues, the existing management systems and recommendations for better future results in a lecture on Cook Campus on October 8. Read more in The Daily Targum.

Bring Your Own Broomstick: University Quidditch Team Was a Key Factor in SEBS Student Choosing Rutgers

Rutgers Quidditch team, known as the Nearly Headless Knights.

Rutgers Quidditch team, known as the Nearly Headless Knights.

While the bludgers, quaffles and snitches have been adapted for muggles playing on solid ground rather than flying on broomsticks, the fantasy sport of Quidditch from the Harry Potter series is a real and competitive sport on many college campuses throughout the world. Nutritional sciences major Kristin Lawton is a huge Harry Potter fan and one of the 13 women on the Nearly Headless Knights team.  “My requirement when I applied to college is that the school have both a marching band and a quidditch team,” said Lawton, one of the team’s chasers. “Luckily Rutgers had both.” Read more at Rutgers Today.

The Hot Pepper Potential: Rutgers Ag Research Aims for Alternative Markets in New Jersey and the Region

Habaneros are among the exotic hot peppers with growing market potential.

Habaneros are among the exotic hot peppers with growing market potential.

It’s hard to be neutral about hot peppers. People often run, pardon the pun, hot or cold when it comes to these spicy meal additions. Those with “seasoned” taste buds may ply their dishes with daring degrees of spiciness, while others who fear the burn decline to indulge. But hot peppers offer more than a spicy bite to meals and present some other uses that can turn up the heat on its market potential. [Read more...]

Student Film Features Professor’s Battle Against White Nose Syndrome in Bats

Marine and Coastal Sciences major Jill Azzolini (SEBS 2015), who worked as a summer intern with Day’s Edge Productions, used her newly-acquired digital filmmaking skills to create a short film of Rutgers Assistant Research Professor of Wildlife Biology Brooke Maslo’s work on reviving bat populations that have been decimated by White Nose Syndrome. Azzolini was able to design an internship that enabled her to combine her creativity and enthusiasm with her interest in the environment in the production of this short film. Read more about Azzolini’s work on the film.

Video: Fight for Flight: The Battle Against White Nose Syndrome