What’s in Season from the Garden State: Making Bucks from Clucks, Not Books

Student Sustainable Farm interns (l-r) Angela Polites, Peter Canavan and David Perotti.

Student Sustainable Farm interns (l-r) Angela Polites, Peter Canavan and David Perotti.

Historically, young people were taught a trade by serving as apprentices or learning the ropes from a relative in a family business. While modern education emphasizes learning through books, classroom and lab experience, academia has increasingly embraced the value of hands-on involvement and commonly provides students opportunities for fieldwork or internships.

Agricultural entrepreneurship offers its own unique set of challenges, since there is a business management component in addition to agricultural production. What better way for modern-day college students to learn both aspects than to run their own agricultural enterprises, right on the college farm? At the Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS), a number of ag entrepreneurship opportunities have “cropped up” over the years. [Read more...]

From Tour of Duty to Reaping the Bounty: Green Job Skills and Entrepreneurship the Focus of RCE Program for Veterans

Members and instructors of the Rutgers VETS program.

Members and instructors of the Rutgers V.E.T.S. program.

Unemployed U.S. veterans are often an underserved, vulnerable population that can benefit from job training. Through a partnership coordinated by Rutgers Cooperative Extension (RCE) of Essex County, unemployed New Jersey veterans have been trained through a green job skills program focused on sustainable landscaping and stormwater management. At the East Orange Veterans Affairs Hospital, veterans were able to learn green job skills as they served as an important workforce for preventing stormwater damage and beautifying hospital grounds. The success of this effort provided a fertile ground for growing a broader program, the Rutgers Veterans Environmental Technology and Solutions Program (Rutgers V.E.T.S.) that encompasses developing these skills within an entrepreneurial framework. [Read more...]

Graduate Students Affiliated with Haskin Lab Score Scholarship “Trifecta”

Amanda Wenczel

Amanda Wenczel

Three Rutgers graduate students affiliated with the Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory, Amanda Wenczel, Jason Morson and Jenny Paterno, have each been awarded a George Burlew Scholarship Grant from the Manasquan River Marlin and Tuna Club to help support their marine science research. This grant was previously awarded to high school students and college students but today is only awarded to full- or part-time graduate students pursuing marine-related studies.

Jason Morson

Jason Morson

Wenczel’s research focuses on the study of the potential feeding interactions of native New Jersey shellfish while Paterno’s research interests are restoration ecology in aquatic systems and community science education. Morson’s research explores the application of targeted biological and ecological data to reduce uncertainty in fisheries stock assessment model parameters.

Jenny Paterno

Jenny Paterno

The George Burlew Scholarship Grant was first awarded in June 1979 in honor of Captain George Burlew, who was a member of the Manasquan River Marlin and Tuna Club and a pioneer of sport fishing on and out of the Manasquan River. Captain Burlew was a well-known fishing guide and a long-time owner of Burlew’s Anchorage in Manasquan.

 

How to Bank on the Old Raritan: Rutgers Co-Sponsors Sustainable Raritan River Conference Valuing Natural Capital

The Sustainable Raritan River Collaborative held its 6th Annual Sustainable Raritan River Conference and Awards Ceremony on June 13 at the Cook Campus Center.

The Sustainable Raritan River Collaborative held its 6th Annual Sustainable Raritan River Conference and Awards Ceremony on June 13 at the Cook Campus Center.

Healthy ecosystems are ecological life-support systems providing an array of goods and services vital to human health and livelihood. These natural assets are referred to as “ecosystem services”.

According to the USDA, many of these goods and services are traditionally viewed as free benefits to society, or “public goods” such as wildlife habitat and diversity, watershed services, carbon storage, and scenic landscapes. Lacking a formal market, these natural assets are traditionally absent from society’s balance sheet; their critical contributions are often overlooked in public, corporate, and individual decision-making. [Read more...]

HomeStyles: Helping Parents Create Healthier, Safer Homes

Family TableNutritional science professors Carol Byrd-Bredbenner and John Worobey and research assistant Jennifer Martin-Biggers created HomeStyles, an 18-month online program that offers quick, fun tips to educate parents of preschoolers on how to shape their homes and lifestyles. Read more at Rutgers Today.