Shore’s back bay areas struggle with flooding as sea level rises

It doesn’t take a superstorm, just a steady rain to flood Frank Santora’s street. Water runs down Bayside Terrace into the lagoon and when it rises above the stormwater valve, which it frequently does, it bubbles back into the street where it sits until it evaporates, he said…"They have had to struggle with flooding from low-lying areas around Barnegat Bay. It’s going to get worse with rising sea level. We know that. We’re anticipating that and there needs to be strategies put in place," said Michael Kennish, a Rutgers University research professor at the Institute of Marine and Coastal Science in New Brunswick.

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Odds are it will be cold during Super Bowl

Among the major storylines for the Super Bowl XLVIII matchup between the Denver Broncos and Seattle Seahawks at MetLife Stadium on Feb. 2 is Peyton Manning’s quest for a second NFL championship and how much the weather will impact conditions. "I think it’s fascinating that the fact is (the main storyline) involves both Peyton and the weather because everybody feels he’s not as good of a quarterback in the cold weather," said Dave Robinson, a Rutgers University geography professor. "So the two are inextricably linked." Robinson is no expert on football, but his expertise figures to draw as much hype over the next 10 days as the stories centered on whether Seattle’s stout defensive secondary can thwart an explosive Broncos attack featuring Manning’s record-breaking arm and the running of Middletown South graduate Knowshon Moreno.

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Jersey Shore sea level could rise 1.5 feet by 2050, Rutgers scientist predicts

The sea level is expected to rise about 1.5 feet off the Jersey Shore by 2050, and a 10-year nor’easter in 2100 would cause more flooding in Atlantic City than happened during superstorm Sandy, a Rutgers scientist predicted Thursday. Sea-level rise is not a disaster in the near-term, "but it is a concern that must be planned for," said Kenneth G. Miller, a Rutgers University professor and lead author of a study published this week. "And to a certain extent, it doesn’t matter if you believe in global warming or not,” said Miller, a professor of earth and planetary sciences. "We know that sea level is rising globally and we know that New Jersey is sinking."

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November dry in N.J., despite wet nor’easter

November was dry in New Jersey, despite heavy rain from the Nov. 26-27 nor’easter, according to experts. The storm brought "abundant rainfall, something much of the state hadn’t experienced since late summer," according to a report by David A. Robinson, the New Jersey state climatologist at Rutgers University. The nor’easter dumped 3.56 inches of rain in Hawthorne, 3.34 inches in Basking Ridge, 2.38 inches in Hillsborough and 2.29 inches in Holmdel, according to the NJ Storm Dashboard.

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Coastal snowstorm now looks less likely, experts say

The odds of a coastal storm dumping snow in New Jersey next week have plunged – for now, according to experts. Major forecast models now project a storm developing farther offshore around mid-week, but things could change, experts said Friday. David A. Robinson, the New Jersey state climatologist at Rutgers University, said "all bets are not off, but I wouldn’t plan on it swinging around again. Sometimes models lose a storm for a couple of days, but this doesn’t seem to be that case," Robinson said. "You still (see) a storm out there on the books" somewhere over the Atlantic Ocean.

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