New Concerns Raised About Yellow Dyes

Next time you buy a bath towel, T-shirt or even notepad, you might want to think twice before picking the color. A new study by Rutgers University found that yellow dyes found in many common household products and items could contain a potentially harmful chemical that may be bad for your health. That chemical is PCB 11, which is regularly found in yellow dyes in printing inks, paper, paint and clothing, said Lisa Rodenburg, one of the study’s authors and associate professor in environmental chemistry at Rutgers…"PCBs cause a whole range of really worrisome health problems," Rodenburg said in an interview today with "Good Morning America." "There is enough evidence that there could be health effects from this specific kind of PCB that we should investigate further."

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The Strange World of U.S. Horse Meat Regulation

After the reports of possible traces of horse meat in IKEA’s famous meatballs in Europe, the U.S. Department of Agriculture was quick to point out that Americans need not worry. Horse meat isn’t brought into the country for human consumption…"It is a hugely political issue – it has to do with the slaughter of horses and whether that’s acceptable to U.S. society or not – and so there are two sides to the argument," said William Hallman, director of the Food Policy Institute at Rutgers University in New Jersey.

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European Horse Meat Scandal Not Likely to Happen in U.S.

Europeans were horrified to learn that their frozen processed beef products — including lasagna and hamburger — tested positive for horse meat, but experts said it was unlikely that horsemeat could ever make it onto plates on this side of the Atlantic. The United States no longer slaughters horses or imports horse meat from other countries, a U.S. Department of Agriculture spokesman told ABCNews.com…"It’s difficult to say that it could never happen here, but it’s a lot less likely," said William Hallman, the director of the Food Policy Institute at Rutgers University. "The bottom line is that no horse meat is legally being slaughtered for commerce right now in the United States."

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Lousy Science Behind Waxing, Lice Debate

Despite reports to the contrary, pubic lice will not be joining the Karner Blue Butterfly or the Hine’s Emerald Dragonfly on the endangered species list any time soon. No need to save phthirus pubis from crabpocalypse…"I do not think pubic lice will become endangered simply because the host is abundant and many people in the world still lack access to hot water," said Changlu Wang, an urban entomologist at Rutgers University.

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Oysters Eyed as Help for New York Harbor

They are soft to the touch, but surrounded by a hard rough shell. Known as filter feeders, many as small as your thumb, they use their tiny cilia to draw in plankton, sediment and other particles over their gills and spit out cleaner water…These ecological engineers work round the clock filtering water, says Beth Ravit, an environmental scientist and professor at Rutgers University. One little oyster, or mussel, too, can filter up to 50 gallons of water a day.

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